History

The State of Things
12:02 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Movie Series Looks At History Of America's Music

America's Music is a film and performance series at the North Regional Branch of Wake County Libraries.
Credit http://www.wakegov.com/libraries/events/Pages/americasmusic.aspx

Music and Art Professor Jonathan Kramer discusses his collaborative film project, 'America’s Music'

America’s Music is a film and performance series that traces the soundtrack of a nation. The program features documentary screenings and discussions about the history of 20th century American popular music from blues to Broadway and bluegrass to rock 'n' roll. 

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Politics & Government
2:00 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Name That Governor - New Poster Going To Schools

The succession of North Carolina Governors poster.
Credit NC Bankers Association

Curious to know what all the North Carolina governors looked like? Now you can see all 68 (well, most of them) in one place, thanks to the North Carolina Bankers Association. They’ve reissued their poster of the state’s gubernatorial lineage, which hadn’t been updated in more than 50 years.  

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The State of Things
12:02 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Researcher Documents The Use Of Music In War

Cover of the book 'Sounds of War: Music in the United States during World War II'.
Credit Philip E Pascuzzo/National Archives / Oxford University Press

    

World War II was fought not only with guns and bombs but also with strings, brass, and percussion.

The American government used classical music as part of the war effort to demonstrate the cultural dominance of the Allies. The military also used songs to rally American troops.

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Military
5:00 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Outer Banks To Honor Runaway Slaves

An underground railroad historical marker, like this one from Ohio, will be dedicated at the site.
Credit HystericalMark via Flickr, Creative Commons

A little known part of Civil War history will be honored today on the Outer Banks.  A marker will honor a group of slaves who fled to the area in August, 1861 on their way north to freedom.  About 100 slaves helped Union troops load ships and build fortifications after the capture of forts Hatteras and Clark in return for food and shelter. 

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Arts & Culture
4:57 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Country's Oldest Known Inland European Settlement Unearthed In Western NC

The remains of Fort San Juan.
Credit Robin Beck

A group of archeologists has discovered the remains of the oldest known European settlement in the inland U.S.: a 16th century Spanish fort in western North Carolina. 

Fort San Juan was the largest of six forts built between 1566 and 1568 by explorer Juan Pardo. It’s located five miles north of Morganton at a site that was believed to be an Indian settlement. 

Robin Beck is an assistant professor of archeology at the University of Michigan and was part of the discovery team.  He says the site has something in common with North Carolina's more famous early settlement.

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The State of Things
10:52 am
Wed June 26, 2013

UNC Professor Educates Maya Descendants

Patricia McAnany researched Mayan ruins in Belize. The Xunantunich ruins of western Belize are pictured above.
Credit cjuneau via flickr

Patricia McAnany had a moment of clarity when a young girl of Maya descent asked her why all the Maya people had to die. McAnany knew that the ancient Maya civilization collapsed in the 8th and 9th centuries, but she also knew that the Maya people continued to exist right up until the modern day.

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The State of Things
10:51 am
Tue April 2, 2013

A North Carolina Family Lives State's History

Professor Chris Benfey
Credit mtholyoke.edu

Author Chris Benfy talks about his new book 'Red Brick, Black Mountain, and White Clay

Several years ago, Chris Benfey decided to write a traditional memoir. He soon realized, however, that his family was anything but traditional. His new book, “Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay” (Penguin/2012), is part memoir, part history, part archeology.

It tells the stories of his ancestors’ work as bricklayers, his father’s escape from Nazi Germany and his great aunt and uncle’s pivotal role in the founding of Black Mountain College. Chris Benfey is a Professor of English at Mount Holyoke College. He joins Host Frank Stasio to discuss his family’s North Carolina stories.

Arts & Culture
11:12 am
Mon March 25, 2013

State Celebrates 350th Anniversary Of Carolina Charter

The first page of the Carolina Charter of 1663.
Credit N.C. State Archives

People interested in the history of North Carolina can see the front page of the Carolina Charter on display today in Raleigh.  The 350-year-old old document represents the land grant from the King of England to eight of his closest friends and allies who helped him when he was restored to the throne. 

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Arts & Culture
8:59 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Massive Cannon from Blackbeard's Ship to Emerge

Archaeologists preparing to dive.
Credit N.C. Dept. of Cultural Resources

At the bottom of Beaufort Inlet sits an eight-foot cannon that once fired from the decks of the Queen Anne’s Revenge. It’s been there since the ship sank in 1718, and the famous pirate Blackbeard was captured. A crew of archaeologists heads out to bring the cannon to the surface today. Mark Wilde-Ramsing is the director of the Queen Anne’s Revenge Shipwreck project and an underwater archaeologist with the state. He joined WUNC's Eric Hodge to talk about the project.

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Arts & Culture
6:10 am
Mon July 11, 2011

"Freedom Rallies" Honored in Williamston

The “Freedom Rallies” of 1963 were remembered and honored yesterday with a North Carolina Highway Historical Marker. 

The “Freedom Rallies” took place in the town of Williamston – in Martin County.  For 32 days – hundreds of mostly African Americans held mass meetings and marches, anchored at Green Memorial Church.  Diane Carr was 12-years-old during the “Freedom Rallies” and remembers singing and marching to the courthouse to demand equal rights.

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