History

The State of Things
11:57 am
Wed December 10, 2014

A New Take on Shakespeare’s Life And Marriage

Scholar Lena Orlin has a new take on the life and marriage of William Shakespeare.
Credit Flickr/Books18

This year marks the 450th birthday of William Shakespeare, and worldwide celebrations earlier this year indicated that his life and work continue to transcend racial, ethnic and geographic boundaries. 

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The State of Things
12:00 pm
Wed December 3, 2014

A Bartender Spins Patrons' Tales

Credit Livingston Press

    

Durham writer Gregg Cusick's day job as a bartender allows him to write about some things he hears from the other side of the bar.

He uses just a few elements of the tales from his patrons to create historical fiction in the form of short stories.

His first book, My Father Moves Through Time Like a Dirigible (Livingston Press/2014), is a collection of short stories that explore our emotional connections to our own stories of love, loss and humor.

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Arts & Culture
7:14 am
Tue November 25, 2014

Snapshots Capture Life in Depression-Era North Carolina

Roadside meeting with Durham County farmer. North Carolina. He gives road directions by drawing the dirt with a stick. July 1939
Credit Dorothea Lange / Library of Congress Call Number LC-USF34-020259

During the Great Depression, the federal government sent photographers around the country to meet Americans and document their lives. Those photographers took some 170,000 photographs throughout the latter half of the 1930s and into the 194os. The images they captured are among the most iconic of the era.

There's a new way to browse the images by state and even by county. The site is called Photogrammer and it was created by a team at Yale University.

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The State of Things
11:10 am
Tue November 18, 2014

City Makes Move For Greensboro Civil Rights Museum

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Credit Jeff Tiberii

  

The International Civil Rights Center & Museum in Greensboro was built to commemorate a transformative moment in civil rights history when four NC A&T freshmen staged a sit-in at the city's whites-only lunch counter. 

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The State of Things
11:45 am
Tue August 12, 2014

New Museum Exhibit On LGBTQ Perspectives On Equality

The Levine Museum of the New South is hosting a historic exhibit on the LGBTQ community of Charlotte.
QNotes

The Levine Museum of the New South recently unveiled a historic exhibit that spotlights the LGBTQ community of Charlotte. 

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Arts & Culture
8:48 am
Thu June 5, 2014

The Document That Ended American Slavery Hits The Road

North Carolina's copy of the 13th Amendment will be on display at the courthouse in Historic Edenton for the first stop of its tour.
Credit NC Department of Cultural Resources

North Carolina's copy of the 13th Amendment is now on tour.  The document that marked the formal end of slavery in the US will be on display at the courthouse in Historic Edenton. 

Officials say the series of stops at historic sites across the state is part of the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War.  The timing is also linked to Juneteenth. African Americans observe June 19th as when the last of the enslaved learned they were free in the summer of 1865. 

Sarah Koontz is a state archivist.  She said the document has to be handled with care.

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The State of Things
12:11 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Poems Of Teachers And Tigers

Alloy book cover
Credit boomerangbooks.com

    

Inspiration for poetry can strike anywhere, even at the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro. A visit there sparked one of the poems in "Alloy" (2014, WordTech Communications), the latest book from Larry Johnson. 

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The State of Things
12:35 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Holocaust Survivors Tell Their Stories

Prisoners at Ebensee Concentration Camp in 1945. Many of those who survived camps like these now speak out as a part of Speaker's Bureaus around the country.
Credit Creative Commons

With each passing year, we lose more survivors of World War II. And not just the soldiers who fought, but the targeted civilians who survived the Holocaust. In honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day, we share a few of their stories.

We begin by talking with speakers from the Chapel Hill-Durham Holocaust Speakers Bureau. It works to preserve the lessons of the Holocaust for future generations. Host Frank Stasio talks with three people from the Bureau: Sharon Halperin, the daughter of two Holocaust survivors; Peter Stein, a survivor from Czechoslovakia; and Renee Fink, a survivor from Holland.

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Arts & Culture
7:53 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Plaque Honors Historic Significance of High Point Market

North Carolina will unveil a historic marker for the original High Point Market building.
Credit High Point Market Authority

The state Department of Cultural Resources has installed a North Carolina Highway Historical Marker at High Point Market.

Gov. Pat McCrory is scheduled to attend the unveiling ceremony there today.

The original market building was constructed in 1921 with 249,000 square feet of show space. Now the market offers 11.5 million square feet, and contributes more than $5 billion dollars to the state economy every year.

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The State of Things
11:46 am
Thu April 17, 2014

The Secret World of Dr. Seuss

The Hat behind The Cat in the Hat
™ & © 2013 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. All Rights Reserved

 

For many, Dr. Seuss is an icon of clever rhymes and fantastical children's book characters. But few people know he also created elaborate paintings and sculptures. Or that he had a room filled from floor to ceiling with hats. Curator Bill Dreyer describes one use Seuss had for the hats:

If a party was lagging a little bit, he would go into the hat closet, bring out hats, put them on people's heads and ask them to spend the rest of the evening in the persona they might expect the person wearing that hat would have.

 The touring "Hats Off to Dr. Seuss" exhibit includes paintings, sculptures and hats from Seuss' personal collection. The collection is on display at The Art Shop in Greensboro through April 19th. Dreyer believes Dr. Seuss is just beginning to receive the recognition he deserves as a fine artist:

Here we are, 23 years after Ted Geisel passed away and he's now really being considered a significant 20th century American artist because people are viewing his art as separate from... his most important legacy, children's literature.

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