Health

The Status of Girls in North Carolina
Meredith College

Two new reports examine the status of girls and women in North Carolina.  As it turns out, girls are bucking the stereotype. They’ve seen gains in math and science testing.

"Middle school is when we typically think of girls sort of disengaging from science and math," Amie Hess told Frank Stasio in an interview on The State of Things.  Hess is the lead researcher on The Status of Girls in North Carolina. "What we found when you look at the 8th grade end-of-grade testing rates is that girls are right on par with boys.  In some cases, [they are] slightly ahead of boys," she said. 

Dr. Leslie Smith speaks on the State of Things.
boonesunriserotary.org

When Leslie Smith was 24 years old, she was in a fire. After spending 3 months at the Jaycee Burn Center in Chapel Hill, she was released. Smith told Host Frank Stasio “It took me about ten years to recover from those injuries.”

“I had bandages from my neck down to my thighs where my burns were, and then from my thighs down to my ankles where they had taken skin to do skin grafting operations. So I literally was covered from ankle to neck in bandages.”

Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act allows United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement to partner with state and local police. Those officers are allowed to enforce federal immigration law. Critics say that the program leads to racial profiling of minorities and makes immigrants fearful of reporting crime in their own communities.

A years-long project to coordinate heart attack care among North Carolina's hundreds of hospitals and emergency services has shortened response times and reduced the number of deaths.

That's according to a study out this week. One of its authors is Duke cardiologist James Jollis. He says one way the system reduced response times was by creating standard statewide practices for EMS workers.

A network of health experts, policymakers and advocates in the fight against AIDS are gathering for a conference today near the state capitol.

Leoneda Inge: The rate of new HIV cases in North Carolina is 41-percent higher than the national rate. Lisa Hazirjian is the Executive Director of North Carolina AIDS Action Network.

Lisa Hazirjian: It is very scary and it’s part of a southern situation where throughout the southeast we see disproportionately high incidents of new HIV infections.

Wake and Orange counties are the healthiest in the state. That's according to a new study ranking health outcomes by county across the nation. In North Carolina and elsewhere, the healthiest counties tend to be the wealthiest. Michelle Larkin is with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which compiled the study with the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.

Duke researchers say the reasons for a decline in health among recent immigrants may be more complicated than health experts thought. Duke Sociologist Jen'nan Read says researchers may have been drawing the wrong conclusion from data showing that immigrants arrive in the U.S. healthy and then become less so.

Duke Cancer Center Opens

Feb 24, 2012

Cancer patients across the state have a new place to go for treatment. After a week of dedications and tours, the Duke Cancer Center opens to patients Monday. Doctor Michael Kastan is the Executive Director of the Duke Cancer Institute. He says the state-of-the-art seven story building unites a large number of specialists under one roof.

Veterans in need of health care in eastern North Carolina will soon have a bigger facility. An expansion of the Veterans Administration clinic in Greenville gets underway with a ground breaking ceremony Thursday morning. Peter Tillman works for the Durham VA Medical Center. He says the expansion will allow the Greenville clinic to offer more services.

Dr. Nortin Hadler
unchealthcare.org

Dr. Nortin Hadler says the human body has an end date – about 85 years old – and thinking you’re going to live much beyond that is mostly wishful thinking. But the health care industry wants to convince you otherwise, he says. They want you getting heart bypass surgery in your 80s, being treated for cancers that won’t kill you and worrying about a host of problems that aren’t as dangerous as they seem.

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