Head Start

An image of Crystal Sanders
Crystal Sanders

In 1965, a Head Start program called the Child Development Group of Mississippi offered an alternative education for children in low-income communities. It also gave working-class black Mississippians a chance to secure jobs outside of the local white power structure.

Researchers find that bilingual children under the age of five make significant gains in language skills while enrolled in early education programs.
Nazareth College via Flickr

A review by UNC-Chapel Hill researchers confirms that children who speak two languages make greater gains in early education programs than their peers who speak only English.

Scientists at UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute reviewed 25 studies and found that children with low English-language abilities greatly benefit from early childhood programs like Head Start and state-funded Pre-K.