Greensboro

Mark Walker and Laura FJeld both hope to replace 83-year-old Howard Coble who is retiring after 30 years in Congress.
US House of Representatives

North Carolina’s longest serving Republican in the House of Representatives says he will not run for re-election.

Congressman Howard Coble of the sixth district first won his seat in 1984, and has been re-elected ever since then. Coble says he is mentally sharp, but some problems have made him change his mind about running again.

 Coble held a news conference at Guilford County’s Republican headquarters yesterday, recorded by WXII-TV. The 82-year-old said his back and skin cancer issues have begun to catch up with him.
 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

    

The Spartan Jazz Collective from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro is made up of students and faculty.

The group will perform a retrospective of work by percussionist composer and native North Carolinian Max Roach. The Spartan Jazz Collective is Chad Eby, Melvin Holland, Evan Ringel, Jonathan Wiseman, Thomas Linger, Aaron Gross, Kassem Williams, and Dr. Neeraj Mehta.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

The struggling Civil Rights museum in Greensboro will receive a $1.5 million loan from the City. Museum leaders first asked for one and a half million dollars for educational programming earlier this year, than later said they needed the money to keep up with mortgage and loan payments. Members of the city council voted 6-3 Tuesday night and the city will provide half the money in the next 60 days.

Greensboro skyline
Scott Moore, Flickr, Creative Commons

Fundraisers of proposed Greensboro Performing Arts Center announced this week they’ve received $20.7 million dollars in pledged private support. Proponents of the project want to bring a venue similar to D-PAC to Greensboro. It’s estimated to cost $60 million  and the hope was to raise one third of that through private channels.

HealthServe is closing in Greensboro this week and 20,000 people will have to find a medical provider elsewhere.
Flickr.com

The closing of the Healthserve Community Health Clinic in Greensboro is expected to affect thousands of low income patients. The clinic is closing, in part, because of the State legislature’s decision to reject federal Medicaid expansion. Host Frank Stasio talks to WUNC Greensboro Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii about this and other Triad news live from Triad Stage in Greensboro.

New River Breakdown by Terry L. Kennedy
http://www.unicorn-press.org/books/Kennedy-New-River-Breakdown.html / Unicorn Press

    

Terry Kennedy wanted nothing more than to become a business maven and take over the world when he was in college. Literature was for people with too much free time on their hands. But he gradually learned that he was terrible at business and passionate for creative writing. Kennedy's latest book of poetry is called “New River Breakdown” (Unicorn Press/2013).  

Phive is a band based in Greensboro.
Phive, Facebook

  

Greensboro-based band Phive was previously known mainly for their work as a cover band. But they’ve expanded their sound recently, thanks in part to member Afika Nxumalo and his connection to South Africa. His mother grew up there, and her experiences helped inspire the band’s recent song commemorating Nelson Mandela’s birthday, “Madiba.”

HealthServe is closing in Greensboro this week and 20,000 people will have to find a medical provider elsewhere.
Flickr.com

An estimated 20,000 patients will be affected by the closing of a health clinic in Greensboro later this month.  HealthServe provides care for people who are low-income, and have little or insufficient health insurance. The clinic began as a volunteer effort by local doctors in the 1990s. HealthServe has lost funding from the County and Moses Cone Hospital. The State’s recent decision to not expand Medicaid was the third strike.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

The Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro has formally asked city leaders for $1.5 million in funding.

Since the museum opened in 2010, it has run an annual deficit and failed to meet attendance goals. Museum leaders floated the idea of asking the city to help fund educational programs.

Raleigh Mayor Charles Meeker and Mayor-elect Nancy McFarlane
raleighnc.gov

Today was the candidate filing deadline for several area mayoral races. Mayors in Durham, Raleigh and Greensboro will faces challenges in their bids for reelection.

In Durham, current mayor Bill Bell will be running for re-election with challenges from East Durham minister Sylvester Williams and Michael Valentine, a current member of the Durham Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee.

Phive is a band based in Greensboro.
Phive, Facebook

Greensboro band Phive has released a new single dedicated to Nelson Mandela. They made the announcement yesterday on Mandela Day, the birthday of the South African leader. Phive spoke with PRI's the World from WUNC's studios in Durham. You can listen to the interview here.

Here's the music video of their new song, "Madiba."

Greensboro skyline
Scott Moore, Flickr, Creative Commons

Downtown Greensboro should be a litter quieter late at night following a new ordinance passed by the City Council.  The new regulations are aimed at quieting night clubs. Some downtown residents have long complained about loud late-night music. Members of the council voted 7 to 2 capping noise at 65 decibels after 11:00 p.m.

Nikita Gale is the current artist in residence at Elsewhere.
Nikita Gale

Greensboro’s self-defined “living museum” and art space, Elsewhere, has several new projects in store this summer.

This spring, the space launched one of its newest endeavors entitled “Southern Constellations.” The project attempts to bring together a network of experimental multimedia artists from around the south into Elsewhere’s creative space.

Greensboro established a summer curfew for its youth.
Jeff Tiberii

The Triad has a few changes in store for their region’s youth this summer, including a new summer curfew.

The Greensboro City Council voted on the curfew in a special meeting, and it went into effect on July 3. The new restriction stipulates that teenagers are not to be in downtown without an adult between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. 

Jeff Tiberii is WUNC’s Greensboro Bureau Chief and joins State of Things Host Frank Stasio live at the Triad Stage to discuss the curfew and other new developments in the Triad.

Greensboro skyline
Scott Moore, Flickr, Creative Commons

Teenagers in Greensboro now have a summer curfew. The City Council voted 8-1 at a special meeting this morning to implement a curfew for 60 days in the downtown area. The mandate follows a recent string of fights between young teenagers.

City Concilwoman Marikay Abuziwaiter witnessed an altercation last weekend and supports the curfew.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum opened in Greensboro nearly three and a half years ago.  A national sit-in movement began on February 1st, 1960 at an F.W. Woolworth lunch counter on Elm Street, and today that site remains a commemoration and celebration of a chapter in American history.

UFO
dimland via Google Images

The Center for UFO Research is hosting a conference in Greensboro this weekend. Organizers say it will be a gathering of government officials and military witnesses, as well as UFO researchers and experts.
 
Richard Haynes is one of the speakers at the event. He says his talk will focus on how UFOs affect the safety of airplanes and pilots. Haynes says right now, pilots are shamed when they report on UFOs.

Ndabarushimana Christopher is a musician and refugee from Burundi who now calls Greensboro his home.
Ndabarushimana Christopher

Now in its fourth year, the Mosaic Festival celebrates the diversity and cultures of the Triad, attracting thousands of attendees. Host Frank Stasio talks with Sarah Ivory, director of the Immigration and Refugee Program of Church World Service of Greensboro, which organizes the festival. Plus, the band Wareware featuring Ndabarushimana Christopher, a Greensboro musician and refugee from Burundi, performs live at Triad Stage.

Hannah Wade takes control of the FAA-approved flight simulator at the Aviation Academy in High Point.
Jeff Tiberii

Across the state thousands of high school students will graduate this weekend. About three dozen are from the Aviation Academy at T.W. Andrews High School in Guilford County. It’s one of only a few such programs in the state preparing young men and women for careers in aeronautics and engineering. And after two classes of students, the program’s graduate rate is perfect. 

  

Jake Henry is overseeing the table program in Guilford County.
Jeff Tiberii

Thirteen thousand students in Guilford County will receive tablets computers when they begin school this fall. Last year the county was awarded a federal “Race to the Top” grant for 30 million dollars. Now one of the largest classroom technology initiatives in US history is underway. 

Greensboro skyline
Scott Moore, Flickr, Creative Commons

Leaders in Greensboro are accepting submissions for a federal grant that will award one million dollars for an innovative plan.  The winning idea is supposed to help the city’s economy by designing a way to improve long-term job prospects.  Organizers admit they’re being purposely vague to see what kind of submissions they get to develop the city.  A panel of about 20 people that will ultimately chose the winning entry, met for the first time on Wednesday.

Students in a Guilford County school classroom on computers.
Guilford County Schools

This fall about 13,000 middle school students in the Guilford County Schools district will receive tablets. It’s part of a $30 million Race to the Top grant that Guilford won last year. Administrators and teachers will receive training from a company called Amplify in the coming months. 

Greensboro received an F-rating for air quality.
Derrick Matthews, via Flickr, Creative Commons

The American Lung Association’s annual State of the Air report is out, and it slots Greensboro as the 42nd most polluted metro area in the county.  The city received an F-rating.

Laura-Kate Bender, who worked on the report, says the news wasn’t all bad.

"Despite getting an ‘F,' the area actually got its lowest overall number of smog days," she says. "So even though it received a failing grade, it’s a significant improvement over last year."

Downtown Greenway in Greensboro, public art,
Action Greensboro

With springtime comes the urge to get outdoors, and in a handful of North Carolina’s cities and towns, a growing network of greenways is making that easier to do. While North Carolina does not stand out nationally for its volume of bicycle commuters (it ranks 41st in the country), it does have a higher bike commuting rate than any neighboring state except Virginia. And several of North Carolina’s cities have adopted transportation plans to accommodate a higher volume pedestrians and cyclists.

https://www.facebook.com/TEDxGreensboro / TedxGreensboro

TEDx is the community offshoot of TED, a nonprofit dedicated to "Ideas Worth Spreading." Greensboro is the site of a spring conference, featuring such speakers as Daniel Herr, a neuroscientist giving the talk, "The Language of Nature: what's the big deal about nano"; and Katie Marshall, a corporate communicator at Volvo Financial Services, talking about her passion for Greensboro, and the intersection between college and professional life.

The State of Things in Greensboro 4/4/2013

Apr 2, 2013

About once a month The State of Things packs up our Mobile 1 and heads to Greensboro for a broadcast from The Triad Stage.  Here's what's coming up on the next show this Thursday, April 4:

Stumps like this one have become more common in Greensboro neighborhoods. Duke energy says it cuts when necessary. Residents think the company is being too aggressive.
Jeff Tiberii

Greensboro residents are upset with Duke Energy again over its tree trimming practices in the city, this time because of pruning around major transmission lines. Concerned locals are taking to Facebook and asking local leaders to do more.

The NC Chamber's plan to grow the economy has four main principals.
NCChamber.net

Governor McCrory spoke Wednesday at a North Carolina Chamber event in Greensboro about how he believes the state can best grow the economy and create jobs. The Republican leader of the state offered five areas in which he says the most attention is needed. He also hinted that in the coming weeks he will propose significant reform to Medicaid and the tax code. 

Greensboro skyline
Scott Moore, Flickr, Creative Commons

Greensboro may have just gained a new downtown grocery storeand hosted this year's ACC Basketball Tournament, but according to some, it is still lacking in one area: sexiness. A new study from the online travel-dating site MissTravel.com dubs Greensboro as the number one least sexy city in America.

The small video camera is made to attach to sunglasses.
Taser.com

The Greensboro Police Department will begin wearing small $1,100 video cameras next month in an effort to improve public trust, give officers peace of mind and capture evidence. The 125 new cameras were paid for with federal stimulus money.  

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