Greensboro

Frank Stasio and Stimp Hawkins share a laugh as Frank tries out the cremation casket.
Ivan Saul Cutler

Retired minister Stimp Hawkins wants to say goodbye before it is too late. The 81-year-old, who has DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) tattooed brazenly across his chest, spends a lot of time thinking about the end of his life and his eventual death.

He hosts monthly meetings called “Café Mortal” and “Death Café” in Greensboro for people to discuss issues related to death and end-of-life concerns. Hawkins recently celebrated his death wish at a decoration party for his cremation casket.

Building A Guitar From Scratch

Jan 12, 2016
Alex Edney (L) and Terry Fritz (R) discussing the bracing on the sides of a guitar.
Fritz and Edney Guitars

Terry Fritz had two loves for most of his life: playing guitar and woodworking. During a job change in 2006, a friend suggested he marry those two passions as a luthier. Fritz quickly fell in love with the process – the properties of wood necessary for a good guitar, how to fasten the neck, the geometry that shapes the timbre of an acoustic guitar, etc.

Image of Greensboro Skyline
Beyonce245 / Wikimedia Commons

Greensboro's economy is recovering from the recession, according to the city's annual growth and development trends report.

Planning Department Director Sue Schwartz says the recession hit Greensboro early, when the local textile and furniture manufacturing jobs moved overseas. Schwartz says aviation manufacturing jobs are making a difference.

"We've seen smaller scale manufacturing coming back, but we've also seen growth in the financial sector and in health care. So we're a more diversified economy, but it takes a while to get to that point."

Several local service and faith organizations hosted a multicultural Thanksgiving Dinner to welcome immigrants and refugees.
Reema Khrais

Local service and faith organizations are urging state leaders to not turn their backs on Syrian refugees.

Responding to a national backlash against Syrian refugees, faith leaders and several groups gathered in Greensboro Monday night for a multicultural Thanksgiving dinner to welcome local refugees and immigrants.

Conservatives Say No To The Death Penalty

Nov 17, 2015
Jon Hardister
North Carolina General Assembly

Support for the death penalty has declined over the past 20 years. A Pew Research Center poll this year shows a 30 percent drop among Democrats and a 10 percent decline in support among Republicans. However, GOP approval of the death penalty is still strong at more than 75 percent.

The Carolina SqiQuarium opened in 2013 as part of expansion plans for the whole Greensboro Science Center. The aquarium features African penguins, sharks, otters and stingrays, among others.
Greensboro Science Center

The Greensboro Science Center is the only institution in North Carolina to house a zoo, aquarium and museum under one roof, and it's one of a handful in the country. The Science Center has been in the Triad since the 1950s, but recent expansion has dramatically grown the facility into a true 3-in-1 destination.

An image of a handshake on an isolated business background
SalFalko / Flickr Creative Commons

Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County leaders are in informal talks about creating a united economic development partnership.

Guilford County Commission chairman Hank Henning says this proposed Guilford County Economic Development Alliance would coordinate to promote the county and its cities as a business destination.

27 Views Of Greensboro

Oct 13, 2015
'27 Views Of Greensboro' takes a look at the city in various forms of writing, from poetry to vignettes to short stories.
Charles Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

Greensboro has a rich history, from its days as a leader in textiles and commerce to the “Greensboro Four” sit-in.  

A group of writers with Greensboro ties came together in “27 Views of Greensboro: The Gate City in Prose & Poetry” (Eno Publishers/2015) with essays, vignettes, poems and other short stories to share their perspectives of the Triad city.

A collection of Blue Bell Wrangler artifacts showcasing their position as a player in both the work clothing and westernwear markets
Evan Morrison

Jeans are one of the most ubiquitous clothing items—found in both high-end designer boutiques and on the shelves at Wal-Mart.

Although they originated as work garments for miners, farmers and cattle workers, they have since become a more everyday item.

President Richard Nixon greeting Robert and his late wife Sallie Brown in the White House
Robert Brown

In the 1960s, High Point resident Robert Brown worked closely with Martin Luther King Jr. as a fundraiser. Brown has also advised several prominent American politicians, including Senators John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy, and Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan.

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