Greensboro Police Department

Courtesy City of Greensboro North Carolina Police

Like many other law enforcement agencies around the country, the Greensboro Police Department is working to improve community relations while facing a period of heightened tension between police and the public, particularly with marginalized communities.

Host Frank Stasio speaks with Greensboro Police Chief Wayne Scott about the unique challenges his department faces along with the continuing battle over policies surrounding access to police body camera footage.

Greensboro Police Department

The Greensboro city council says state officials should revoke the law enforcement license and reconsider charges against a white police officer who violated the department's use-of-force policy in a confrontation with a black man.

Photo of a police officer following the Dallas shooting
AP Photo/LM Otero

Five law enforcement officers were killed last night in Dallas. The murders happened at a protest in response to the killing of two black men this week by law enforcement officers.

On Tuesday, police shot and killed Alton Sterling while they held him down at a convenience store in Baton Rouge, La.

The Greensboro Police Department has been training and deploying its new Civil Emergency Unit.

Captain John Wolfe commands the 90-member team, which is most often mobilized to observe and respond to public demonstrations. The CEU trains several times a year. Wolfe says it has learned from the mistakes of departments who have sent untrained officers to deal with tense protesters.

A picture of a traffic stop
Ildar Sagdejev / Wikipedia

Greensboro's police chief is reporting a steep drop in racially disparate traffic stops.

A picture of lights on a police car.
Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr Creative Commons

In response to allegations of racial disparities in policing, the Greensboro police chief has instructed his force not to stop vehicles for  minor traffic violations based on equipment infractions.

A picture of lights on a police car.
Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr Creative Commons

The Greensboro Police Department is reviewing its records of traffic stops, after a New York Times article revealed deep racial discrepancies.

The newspaper's analysis found that Greensboro police searched black drivers more than twice as often as white drivers, even though they found contraband more often when the driver was white.

A picture of a GPD officer in a polo uniform
SusanC. Danielsen / Greensboro Police Department

 

The police and the public are supposed to talk and listen to each other. But sometimes the all-black police uniforms are intimidating and can cause distance between officers and the community.

In effort to improve its community relationships, the Greensboro Police Department is trying a more casual style of uniform for its officers attending community events. The new uniform is supposed to make officers “more approachable” and open more dialogue with the public.

Garner Police Department, Police OFficers
Leoneda Inge

Commentary about tragic encounters between police and the public, mainly black men, has been a mainstay in the news these days.

Whether it’s the low pay or the bad publicity, police departments say it’s been increasingly hard to recruit new officers.

The images and sounds of police officers in riot gear, marching through the streets of Baltimore are hard to erase.

The City of Greensboro is welcoming police and the community to discuss their relationship tonight.

Greensboro Human Relations Executive Director Love Crossling organized of the event.  She says some neighborhoods are satisfied with their interactions with police officers.

“We have other pockets of the community where there is debate about whether or not there is a level of courtesy and respect and adherence to policy and procedure.”

The small video camera is made to attach to sunglasses.
Taser.com

The Greensboro Police Department will begin wearing small $1,100 video cameras next month in an effort to improve public trust, give officers peace of mind and capture evidence. The 125 new cameras were paid for with federal stimulus money.  

Bloodhound Ellie Mae with her handler officer J.D. Fraser
Jeff Tiberii

About 20 bloodhounds from across the country are in the Triad this week working to earn certification. Dogs and their handlers are receiving training from the National Police Bloodhound Association. Greensboro K-9 officer J.D. Fraser works with four-legged partner Ellie Mae. She is trained to assist in missing person searches. Officer Fraser says the re-certification process hones Ellie Mae's skills and gives credibility to the practice.

The Greensboro Police Department is getting a new headquarters.

Earlier this year the city purchased the old IRS building for 1 dollar. The 94,000 square foot building will undergo 900 thousand dollars in renovations during the next three years. But overall the 56-year-old building is in good condition

Greensboro police Captain Mike Richey: "There's really no telling how long this building will last. the structure, the foundation is in great shape and we expect it to last for years to come"