Greensboro

North Carolina State Capitol, Raleigh.
Jim Bowen / Flickr

The North Carolina House of Representatives has rejected a controversial plan that would limit the authority of the Greensboro mayor and could change the make-up of the city council.

The House rejected the bill in a 73-35 vote on Monday night. A joint committee of House and Senate members will negotiate the terms of the measure, which had been approved by the House as a different plan, before returning it to each chamber for a new vote.

The children's area in the lobby of the new Family Justice Center.
Catherine Johnson / Guilford County Family Justice Center

A Family Justice Center is opening today in downtown Greensboro and will offer a variety of services.

The new building will provide several types of support for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and elder abuse. Those services include law enforcement, legal, medical and social assistance.

Center Director Catherine Johnson said it is a benefit that the building is a one-stop spot for people dealing with these issues.  

An image of somebody picking strawberries
Joseph Rodriguez / News & Record www.greensboro.com

Matthew King’s motto is simple: “think global but act local.”

For King, this is the solution to food insecurity. He is the executive director of Vision Tree Community Development Corporation, a nonprofit that helps Greensboro residents get food to their doorstep with mobile food markets. He said the basic idea of connecting urban farmers to local consumers can be applied anywhere in the world, but Greensboro needs it more than ever.

Image of John Hitchcock with the Front Row Gang
John Hitchcock

Greensboro native John Hitchcock attended nearly every professional wrestling show in the Greensboro Coliseum for 15 years. He was a part of a group of troublemakers who sat in the front of the coliseum cheering loudly for the bad guys and getting a rise out of the crowd and the wrestlers.

Mitchell Oliver

North Carolina native Anne-Claire Niver has been singing since she was a young child. After studying music and vocal performance at UNC-Greensboro and traveling the world, she moved home to North Carolina and started work at a family-owned farm near Rougemont.

Filming of This is My Home Now.
Siera Schubach-Mariah, Dunn Kramer, Dean MacLeod

Some of the first Montagnard immigrants, people from a mountain region of Southeast Asia, to came to North Carolina in 1986 and 1987. They were granted refugee status in recognition of their support to the U.S. Special Forces during the Vietnam War. But since then, the newest immigrants have made their way to America because they were fleeing religious and political prosecution. TheMontagnard families live in two worlds: one that is still close to the traditions and ways of their homeland and the other in modern American society.

I Don't Do Boxes is a new LGBTQ magazine created by and for queer youth.
idontdoboxes.org

I Don't Do Boxes is a new magazine that explores and documents the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender experience in the southeast United States. The magazine was founded and edited by the youth-led media program QueerLab. Each issue is designed to provide a unique look at what it means to be queer in the South by tackling topics like identifying as LGBTQ in school or the power of documenting LGBTQ voices.

Black and white photo of band on couch.
thegenuinemusic.com

The Genuine is a four-piece band from Winston-Salem. The band originally began as a project of husband and wife Mathew Allivato and Katelyn Allivato née Brouwer, but now includes an electric guitar, piano and percussion. They are one of the many bands performing at Phuzz Phest in Winston-Salem April 17th -19th, and they will preview their festival performance with a live in-studio performance.

Echo Courts

Apr 10, 2015
Echo Courts plays in Winston-Salem at Phuzz Phest, April 17-19.
Echo Courts

Echo Courts is a five-member surf-rock band out of Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Their second EP, "Ice Cream Social," will have you reaching for your beach towel. But their melancholy lyrics are a contrast to their dreamy, summery sound. The band is playing at Phuzz Phest, a three-day music festival in Winston-Salem next weekend that features more than 60 national and local acts.

The State of Things is headed back to Greensboro's Triad Stage on April 14th for a live broadcast of the show. 

Here's a preview of what we'll be talking about on the show...

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