15-year-old Adam Geringer poses next to a bill he wrote to change North Carolina's grading scale to a 10-point scale so an A is a 90 - 100, instead of a 93-100.
Adam Geringer

 In North Carolina, all public schools are required to grade students on a seven-point scale. That means you get an A if you score between a 93 and 100, and a B if it falls between an 85 and 92.

But one high school student is trying to change that - he says the current scale is unfair and is asking state leaders to consider adopting a 10-point scale instead so that a 90 to a 100 is an A. 

Members of the Broughton High School debate team begin their practice as soon as most students clear out the Raleigh school. 

An image of a sample transcript with contextual grading.

Student transcripts from the University of North Carolina will look pretty different this fall. Beyond course grades and GPAs, the records will also include the median grade and where the student ranked among their classmates.

Sociology Professor Andrew Perrin is leading the charge for the transition to "contextual grading."

“I think this is both about reinforcing our ability to offer excellent education and then also being faithful and fair in our reporting about how well we think students have actually performed in the classroom,” Perrin said.