A picture of a stethoscope.
jasleen_kaur / Flickr/Creative Commons

Duke University settled a lawsuit with eight cancer patients and their families after a former researcher conducted phony genetic trials.

Disgraced former Duke oncologist Anil Potti conducted genetic research for personalized cancer treatments until 2010.

Potti and his team were accused of falsifying data. Soon after, The Cancer Letter reported that Potti lied about scientific honors he received.

Ken Dodge's research has been following the same group of children for more than 20 years.
Ken Dodge


There is a common metaphor in the scientific community that uses flowers to describe children’s sensitivity to their environments.

A child like a dandelion will turn out fine despite the circumstances she is raised in, while a child like an orchid will flounder without a nourishing environment, but blossom with care and support.

A DNA rendering
YNSE / Flickr

An international team of researchers has made landmark progress on the study of Schizophrenia.

A consortium co-founded by the University of North Carolina's Patrick Sullivan reports that it's identified 108 points of genetic variation in people with the illness.

Duke University Hospital
Duke Medecine

Researchers at Duke University will become part of a national network focusing on undiagnosed diseases.

The National Institutes of Health have granted $7.2 million for geneticists at Duke to look at the rarest diseases in the world, affecting fewer than 50 patients each.

Doctor David Goldstein is one of the principle investigators for the project. He says a team at Duke has spent four years taking what used to be a purely clinical investigation and moving it into the world of genetics.

Meet Nico Katsanis

Jun 11, 2012

What can fish teach us about ourselves? Nico Katsanis thinks there might be quite a bit. He’s planting human genes in zebrafish to see what he can learn about brain development.

Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill are studying how doctors might use human genome sequencing in their private practices. The university is one of five institutions to receive a $6.4 million grant for the project. Scientists have spent the last two decades identifying and mapping each of the three billion groups of molecules that make up human DNA. UNC School of Medicine doctor Jim Evans says the next step is developing genomes as a reliable way to identify genetic diseases.

NC Voices: Gene Testing

Oct 15, 2007

Since experts mapped the human genome, the continuous flow of new information has affected decisions people are making about their health. As part of our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," producer Susan Davis considers what people learn from genetic testing and if it’s always helpful. When Susan’s father died of Alzheimer’s disease in 1992 experts were not sure if there was a genetic link to the disease. But now they’re sure. And there’s a test she could take to find out if she has it.