Gas Tax

Photo: North Carolina license plates
Flickr User Eugena Ossi

Almost two dozen laws will go into effect on Jan. 1, impacting issues including health, transportation and firearm ownership in North Carolina.

Photo: NC Legislative building
Jorge Valencia

A busy Tuesday at the General Assembly ended with mixed results for proposals on religion, taxes and redistricting.

A bill that could allow private businesses to refuse service to someone based on personal religious beliefs could stall in the House. 

Meanwhile, the House and Senate agreed to lower North Carolina's gas tax by 3.5 cents over the next year. And a House committee approved a measure that would redistrict Wake County's Board of Commissioners.

North Carolina legislative building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

The first law Gov. Pat McCrory signs this year could be an agreement between the House and Senate to slowly drop North Carolina's tax on gas.
 

Under a plan approved by top members of each chamber last week, the gas tax would fall on Wednesday to 36 cents from 37.5 cents, then to 35 cents in January and to 34 cents in July 2016.

The measure would eliminate a plan previously approved by lawmakers that, according to legislative analysis, would've cut the gas tax significantly more, potentially costing dozens of jobs at the state Department of Transportation.

Photo: The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Jorge Valencia

State legislators sparred over job incentives and a change to the gas tax during finance and appropriation committees meetings Tuesday. The bills eventually made it out.

There was opposition from both liberals and some conservatives over the tax breaks designed to lure jobs.

Secretary of Commerce John Skvarla told one committee nobody likes incentives, but that the state must be competitive. The Governor has been pushing for extended and expanded incentives.

Political Junkie Ken Rudin

Feb 13, 2015

The governor and the legislature are at odds over changes at the Department of Transportation concerning layoffs and the gas tax. 

Plus, President Obama chose North Carolina native Loretta Lynch to fill the attorney general position, but her confirmation hearings have been delayed. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with political junkie Ken Rudin about these stories and other political news around the state.

Gasoline prices at the Carrboro Food Mart gas station in April 2013
Laura Candler

Lawmakers at the General Assembly have re-written a bill that would mean short-term savings on gas but could eventually lead to higher taxes and the elimination of 500 jobs.

During a meeting of the Senate Finance Committee Tuesday, Republicans said this would cut the gas tax and stabilize an uncertain gas tax revenue stream situation.

"And we need to stabilize the volatility of the gas tax," said bill sponsor Bill Rabon. "That guarantees us adequate funds to maintain our roads, improve our roads and meet our transportation needs."