Film Studies

Promotional still for the movie, 'Citizen Kane'
Alexander Kahle, RKO Radio Pictures / Wikimedia Commons

For decades, Hollywood has reigned as an industry that offers entertainment for mass audiences.

In his new book “Hollywood Aesthetic: Pleasure in American Cinema” (Oxford University Press/2017), Todd Berliner explores Hollywood as an art form that appeals to a mass audience. From “Citizen Kane” to “Starship Troopers,” filmmakers have used unique styles to construct narratives, ideologies and genres that challenge the industry’s standards.

A promotional still with John Wayne and Claire Trevor from the 1939 American Western film 'Stagecoach'.
Wikimedia Commons

A gun-slinging cowboy on a mission of revenge takes down the enemy in a quick-draw duel.  He then rides off on his trusted steed with the setting sun casting long shadows on the rugged landscape. This is one of the iconic narratives in Western film, a genre which has gone through a massive evolution since its “good versus evil” and “cowboys versus Indians” days.