Gov. Pat McCrory
Governor's Office


Gov. Pat McCrory filed new forms with the State Ethics Commission that show previously undisclosed travel expenses. 

The governor now says outside groups paid for seven of his trips in 2013, totaling more than $13,000. The money comes from appearances at national governors' conferences, including four backed by the Republican Party. 

The governor says it is appropriate for those groups to pay for his travel. Critics say failure to show the expenses on the original form follows a pattern of nondisclosure at the governor's office.

Governor Pat McCrory has amended a state ethics form to include travel expenditures that were previously omitted. 

The form, submitted on Friday and officially filed Monday, shows seven trips valued at more than $13,000.

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A group of faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are pursuing the idea of a new ethics policy.

At a Faculty Executive Committee meeting Monday, epidemiology professor Jim Thomas proposed developing a comprehensive ethics policy for the university as a whole. Thomas says he first suggested the idea a decade ago, but the recent scandal involving sham classes has allowed the proposal to gain traction.

Steph Guinan / Carolina Public Press

The State Ethics Commission is a small group of officials that has the large task of looking out for public corruption. 

Commissioners investigate everything from public officials’ investments to possible conflicts of interest in state government. But a 2012 report gave North Carolina a “C” when it comes to ethics enforcement. 

Michael Christian headshot

Former stockbroker Bernie Madoff and former New York Times journalist Jayson Blair share infamy for their unethical business decisions.

A new report considers the psychology behind these transgressions and shows that misdeeds tend to escalate into larger scandals over time.

Life's difficult choices rarely present themselves in one dramatic question or one big decision. Instead, our most important choices in life, including ethical ones, present themselves in small baby steps.

-Jayson Blair  

headshot of ethicist David Gushee

Many have criticized the American government's use of torture since 9/11 including military experts who say it it is ineffective. But for Christian ethicist David Gushee, the very question of effectiveness is a degrading one. He believes the usefulness of a behavior does not affect its morality. 

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Ethics Bowl
Parr Center for Ethics, UNC-Chapel Hill

Sandhya Mahadevan doesn’t come off as someone who is likely to back down from anyone. She’s whip-smart, looks you dead in the eye when she’s talking to you, and can’t wait to engage on the events of the day.

But after a few years on her high school debate team, even she was looking for something a little less combative. That’s when she heard about the Ethics Bowl. 

Jan Boxill grew up playing football with her 11 siblings at a time when girls weren’t even allowed to march in the band because it was too strenuous. She went on to help found her college basketball team, and later became a college coach. For more than 20 years Jan served as the Public Address Announcer for Women’s Basketball at UNC and was even an announcer at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.