Elections

Fayetteville, NC
City of Fayetteville

Municipal elections take place Tuesday across the state. Just a fraction of registered voters are expected to help decide mayoral races, city council candidacies and one significant school bond measure.

The education referendum is on the ballot in Johnston County. There voters will decide whether or not to allocate $64 million for a school construction bond. Johnston is the second fastest-growing district in the state and leaders say money is needed to provide for the additional student population. There is no organized opposition to the measure.

State Senator Phil Berger
Dave DeWitt

  

Controversy continues at the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services with the Medicaid director resigning after only eight months on the job.

Raleigh city seal
Wikimedia Commons

In Raleigh, all seven council members and the mayor are up for re-election in October, but one race is uncontested.

In others, it’s not clear whether the challengers pose a serious threat. Recent controversy over feeding the homeless in Moore Square and the firing of the long-time Raleigh City Manager are adding some color to the political battles. Host Frank Stasio talks with Ariella Monti, Raleigh Public Record Bureau Chief, about the upcoming elections.

Yoruba Richen a director, producer, and writer of 'The New Black.'
Luke Rattray

  

In November 2008, Barack Obama was elected president of the United States. That same night, Proposition 8 was passed in California, banning gay marriage in the state. 

Obama won by an astounding 24 points in California, leading some to ask if the mobilization of black voters was the critical factor in the passage of Proposition 8. 

Wake County School Bus
Dave DeWitt

 

School Board candidates in Guilford County will have to declare their party affiliation starting with the 2016 election. The move to do away with non-partisan elections comes from a law passed by the General Assembly last month. The measure also decreases the number of school board seats in Guilford from 11 to 9 and re-draws district lines so they’re the same as County Commissioners. 

A steady stream of voters are making their way to the polls this election day across North Carolina.   Elections officials predict as many as two million people will vote today.

Leoneda Inge:  More than two-point-five million people voted early in North Carolina. But not Latarcha Lee of Durham.

Latarcha Lee:  It’s just kind of special like, wait til the last minute, you know.

Leah Tedrick-Moutz isn’t that much of a traditionalist.

There’s a toll-free, non-partisan election hotline available for voters with Election Day questions or problems.

Leoneda Inge:  Faculty and staff at UNC’s law school will be fielding calls as part of the national advocacy protection initiative called “Election Protection.” The number to call is – 1-866-OUR-VOTE.  Elizabeth Haddix is senior staff attorney at the UNC Law Center for Civil Rights.  She expects a lot of calls.

Early Voting
Leoneda Inge

Thousands of people packed polling places across the state yesterday as early voting began.

North Carolina Central University’s drum-line led a parade of voters in Durham to the student union where they could vote early.  Leotrice Pegues is a senior at NCCU.  She was excited about casting her vote early.   Pegues didn’t get to vote in 2008 because she forgot to switch her registration.

Tomorrow is primary day in North Carolina, again. In races in which no candidate received more than 40% of the vote in the May 8th primary, the top 2 vote-getters vie for their party's nomination in a runoff Tuesday. In addition to several U.S. House and General Assembly seats, there are run-offs for 5 statewide offices. Isaac-Davy Aronson has this look at the two candidates for the Republican nomination for Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The Republican Governor's Association is attacking Democratic gubernatorial candidate Walter Dalton in a new television ad.

RGA Ad: Walter Dalton is Bev Perdue's right-hand man. Now Walter Dalton is running away from Perdue.

Gurnal Scott: The ad in part says Perdue and Dalton's policies are the reason for the state's high unemployment rate.

RGA AD: Under Perdue and high tax policies, 40,000 more North Carolinians are out of work.

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