Economy

Leaders of a cooperative featured in Shift Change raise their fists in solidarity
https://www.facebook.com/shiftchangemovie / Shift Change

In America, corporations are king. It’s hard to even think about capitalism without the corporate system that keeps it flowing here in the United States. A movie called "Shift Change" wants to transform the way you think about the economy. It highlights worker-owned businesses in North America and Spain that flip the paradigm of corporate control on its head.

  The nation’s wealth is now concentrated in so few hands, the wealth gap growing so fast, that even its most ardent defenders question whether our current form of corporate capitalism can survive. Gar Alperovitz is looking for the next American Revolution. He is a professor of political Economy at the University of Maryland and author of the book, “What Then Must We Do: Straight Talk about the Next American Revolution” (Chelsea Green/2013). Host Frank Stasio talks to him about what can be done to save capitalism.

Man Vs. Markets

Oct 30, 2012

Paddy Hirsch makes a living breaking complex topics down into understandable parts.

He performs this role as the whiteboard guru of the radio program “Marketplace,” and he also uses his skills to explain the economy in his new book, “Man vs. Markets: Economics Explained (Plain and Simple)”. Host Frank Stasio talks to Paddy Hirsch about the battle between man and the markets.

Walter Dalton
http://www.ltgov.state.nc.us/

The Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lieutenant Governor Walter Dalton, announced an economic plan today that he says will create more jobs. It includes tax breaks for small businesses and a plan to attract more industries to the state. Capitol Bureau Chief Jessica Jones reports. 

Jessica Jones: Dalton officially unveiled his plan on the patio of a popular brewpub in downtown Raleigh earlier today. A few minutes into his speech, he pulled out a sweet potato and proceeded to explain why he’d brought it along to the press conference.

In the aftermath of the 2008 economic collapse, the public clamored for criminal prosecution of those responsible. While some corporations and banks have paid out big fines, few executives have gone to prison. Host Frank Stasio talks to Rick Rothacker, a Reuters banking reporter, about why many criminal corporations have gone unpunished.

Occasionally, there are headlines about a new company coming to the area and bringing a certain number of jobs with it. Politicians love to talk about job creation, but what does it really mean for a local economy when a handful of people have a shot at employment? How many new jobs would it take to have a truly positive impact on a down economy and does it matter if the jobs are low wage?

Businessman Kevin Trapani will tell you that his company, Redwoods Group, does well by doing good.  Redwoods Group recently won an award that validates his claim. B-Lab, an organization that certifies socially responsible companies known as B-corps, named it one of the “Best Companies for the World.”

The down economy has brought with it a lot of foreclosed properties. The North Carolina Bankers Association has developed a website to help get this real estate sold. 

Leoneda Inge:  The new website is called REO Deed Wagon dot com. REOs are real estate owned properties owned by the lender, in this case, a bank.  Brandon Wright is a spokesman for the North Carolina Bankers Association.  He says their goal is to have as many as two thousand properties listed by the end of the year.

A new study shows growth at High Point University has led to an increased economic impact on the local and state economy.

Jeff Tiberii: The report says that the annual economic impact has nearly tripled in just the last seven years. The private university with about 4-thousand undergrads has undergone a significant make-over during that time under President Nido Qubein.

A new report is detailing the economic impact of arts in North Carolina.

Jeff Tiberii: The national study concludes nonprofit arts and cultural organizations in the state had a financial impact of 1.24 billion dollars during the 2010 fiscal year. That ‘impact’ figure includes ticket purchases, estimates on money spent before and after the show, and the salaries art professionals earn. Catherine Heitz New is with the Arts Concil of Forsyth County:

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