Durham

Durham, Durham Rescue Mission, Golden Belt Historic District
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Despite opposition, it’s looking more like the Golden Belt Local Historic District will include a controversial block of property owned by the Durham Rescue Mission.

Durham’s Planning Commission and the Historic Preservation Commission support protecting the last of the old mill houses near the historic Golden Belt manufacturing factories.

A Story Circle at SpiritHouse, Inc., in Durham, North Carolina.
John Biewen / Center for Documentary Studies

Can stories help to bring a community together?  

How about radio stories, conceived and made by citizen storytellers?

Listen to a preview of Storymakers: Durham, a project of the national Localore: FindingAmerica initiative.

photo of Stuart Albright
Stuart Albright

Why do some students succeed while others do not? This question has stumped teachers, school administrators, and education policy professionals who try to stop students from falling through the cracks.

photo of "Midnight Bowling"
Quinn Dalton

In the mid-20th century, bowling became a favorite pastime of many working-class Americans. But in 1970s​ and '80s, bowling began to decline in popularity.

In her latest novel, “Midnight Bowling” (Carolina Wren Press/2016), Greensboro author Quinn Dalton uses the backdrop of this time of cultural transition to tell the story of a young standout bowler who is faced with the challenges of transitioning into adulthood.

Deputy Chief Cerelyn Davis with the Atlanta Police Department and Major Michael Smathers of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police
Deputy Chief Cerelyn J. Davis, Atlanta Police Department/Maj. Michael J. Smathers, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department

After a months-long search, the city of Durham is getting closer to choosing its next police chief. The city manager has announced two finalists: Deputy Chief Cerelyn Davis with the Atlanta Police Department and Major Michael Smathers of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police.

Image of Jim Goodmon, CEO of Capitol Broadcasting Company
Capitol Broadcasting Company

Jim Goodmon was immersed in the world of broadcasting as a young kid, watching his grandfather build Capitol Broadcasting Company from the ground up. He spent his teen years driving around eastern North Carolina giving away free TV antennas to encourage people to start tuning into WRAL.

An image of 'The Road Taken' by Henry Petroski
Bloomsbury Press

Approximately 65,000 bridges in the U.S. are considered "structurally deficient," according to the latest report from the American Society of Civil Engineers. With roads in constant need of repair and bridges collapsing, America's infrastructure is at a crossroads, says author Henry Petroski.

An image of the producers of WUNC's Localore: Finding America
David Brower

 

WUNC is one of 15 stations across the country chosen to be a part of an innovative public media project called Localore: Finding America.  The project is being put together by the Association of Independents in Radio and is funded in large part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.  

As a part of the project, WUNC is partnering with John Biewen, a producer with the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, and will explore the things that bring us together and divide us as a community, like race, class and faith.

Reema Khrais

In Durham’s Central Park School for Children, classrooms look and feel different than they did just a few years ago. Frankly, the charter school is not as upper-middle class or white as it used to be.

“There’s a greater diversity of viewpoints, there’s a greater diversity of perspectives,” Director John Heffernan explains.

Image of Host Frank Stasio, Avett Brothers' Cellist Joe Kwon, and SOT Producer Anita Rao
Charlie SHelton / WUNC

The year is coming to an end, and “The State of Things” staff is taking a moment to reflect on some of the year’s most memorable conversations. Producer Anita Rao’s favorite segments include a conversation commemorating Yusor Abu-Salha, one of the three Muslim students shot and killed in Chapel Hill in February.

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