Duke Divinity School

An image of Dorothy Day
Public Domain / Wikipedia

Note: this segment originally aired April 7, 2016. 

Journalist and social activist Dorothy Day challenged the structure of the Catholic church when she co-founded the Catholic Worker Movement in the 1930s.

The group advocated for direct aid to the poor and civil disobedience on their behalf. Today, Day's granddaughter Martha Hennessy continues Day's work.
 

Image of Kate Bowler with her son and husband
Courtesy of Kate Bowler

When Kate Bowler was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer last year, she thought, “well, isn’t this ironic?” Bowler is a scholar of the prosperity gospel, the theology that those with the right kind of beliefs will receive God’s grace. As she grapples with her diagnosis, she reflects on life, death, and where faith fits into the picture. She wrote about it in the New York Times, "Death, The Prosperity Gospel, And Me."

www.laurenwinner.net
www.laurenwinner.net

Lauren Winner converted to Christianity in an experience she described as "Girl Meets God," the title of her best-selling memoir.

Since then, Winner has rediscovered her faith more than once; she found spiritual solace through community service after her mother died of cancer, and now says she has reacquainted herself with God by exploring Bible passages that equate God and Jesus with everyday images like food, clothing, and laughter. 

Duke Chapel, Duke University, Durham
Dave DeWitt

Campus faith leaders will gather for a panel discussion about sacred space at Duke University this afternoon.

This comes one month after Duke canceled plans to let the Muslim Student Association sound a call to prayer from the Chapel Bell Tower.

When that happened, Chapel Dean Rev. Luke Powery said he would work to keep dialogue open on the issue. Powery says this discussion will be part of a larger series of talks held at the chapel called Bridge Panels.

Duke released a new study that looks at the high depression rate in clergy members.
public domain

A new study from Duke shows that clergy have a higher rate of anxiety and depression than the national average. The study, conducted by the Clergy Health Initiative at Duke Divinity School, surveyed all United Methodist Clergy in North Carolina and found that their depression rate was 8.7 percent, which is higher than the national average of 5.5 percent. Anxiety rates were 13.5 percent.

Charles Lindquist
Duke Clergy Health Initiative

Like their good friends the Baptists, the Methodists love a good covered dish event. Any church gathering can serve as a reason to bring out the cakes, cookies and casseroles, and in rural North Carolina, that puts church leaders, like Pastor Charles Lindquist, in an awkward position.

“People used to say, ‘get up there in the front of the line’ and you had this feeling of 90 pairs of eyes staring at you to see whose food you were going to take,” says Reverend Lindquist. “So you tried to take some of everything.”