Drugs

photo of "How the Drug War Ruins American Lives" by Art Benavie
Praeger Press

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Comprehensive Crime Control Act. This spurred the "War on Drugs" and allowed the federal government to establish the Assets Forfeiture Fund and bring lawsuits against items of property.

In his new book, How the Drug War Ruins American Lives (Praeger Press/2016), Art Benavie examines how the Assets Forfeiture Fund has eroded American citizens' property rights.

Fayetteville Police Try a New Approach to Drug Crimes

May 18, 2016
A stamp of heroin.
Psychonaught / Wikipedia

When Fayetteville launches its Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program this fall, it will be the first city in the South to try a new approach to policing drug crimes.

Image of green urine sample bottles
Steven Depolo

Earlier this week, state officials released results from the first round of drug testing for some welfare recipients. The findings show little evidence pointing to widespread drug use among beneficiaries of the state's Work First public assistance program. 

A picture of a Wake County Sheriff patch.
scoutnurse / flickr.com/photos/scoutnurse/5362436543

Wake County Sheriff Donnie Harrison plans to hire three new investigators to halt the increase of heavy drugs circulating in the area.

Photo: U.S. Attorney Thomas Walker
Jorge Valencia

Federal prosecutors charged 13 current and former law enforcement officers in connection with a drug shipment network in North Carolina. 

Authorities say seven officers connected to the Northampton County Sheriff's Office conspired to distribute controlled substances from North Carolina to South Carolina and Maryland. Some also face money laundering, extortion and weapons charges.

Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC reporter Jorge Valencia about the indictments.

Image of GlaxoSmithKline headquarters in west London.
Flickr/Ian Wilson

    

Pharmaceutical player GlaxoSmithKline is laying off hundreds of workers in its American facilities, and the bulk of these job cuts are in Research Triangle Park.

Heroin syringe
Thomas Martinsen / Flickr/Creative Commons

"A heroin high .. I ain't going to lie - it's amazing .. you feel like you're Superwoman." 

Wonder why it's hard for some to leave heroin behind? Listen to Jennifer Harris and Brandi Martinez. Both live in High Point, N.C. and both have been clean for two years. (Jennifer talks first.)

Prescription Drug Overdose in North Carolina

Aug 14, 2014
Wikipedia

  

North Carolina has a drug overdose rate that is higher than average. 

Gov. Pat McCrory
NC Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory vetoed two bills today.

One (HB 786) known as the "Reclaiming NC Act" would have required undocumented immigrants to submit to criminal background checks and fingerprinting to obtain driving permits. It also would have allowed police to detain people they suspect of being undocumented for up to 24 hours. It was heavily critiqued by NC's ACLU chapter and others. McCrory said in a statement that he vetoed it due to a loophole that would allow businesses to hire more undocumented workers.

The second bill Gov. McCrory vetoed today (HB 392) would have required drug testing for Work First applicants, a state program that provides financial assistance and job training to needy families.  The ACLU of North Carolina and the N.C. Justice Center had publicly discouraged Gov. McCrory from signing the bill, saying that it would violate the privacy of low-income people.

A Duke University study found a link between poverty and smoking in adolescents.
Valentin Ottone via Flickr, Creative Commons

Researchers at Duke University have been studying the affect of poverty and parenting on substance abuse in adolescents.  The findings suggest self-control for teens is influenced by economic status earlier in life.  The study shows children growing up in poverty are more likely to smoke as adults. 

A Duke University study found a link between poverty and smoking in adolescents.
Valentin Ottone via Flickr, Creative Commons

Duke University is opening a new center dedicated to research on how to curb teen substance abuse. The new Center for the Study of Adolescent Risk and Resilience or "C-StARR" is benefiting from a $6.7 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

B.J. Sanders and her son Chad tell of losing a family member to a drug overdose.
Community Care NC

In 2009, Wilkes County in the northwestern part of the state had the 4th highest rate of prescription drug overdose deaths in the country. Two years later, those numbers dropped by 68 percent. That's because of a program called Project Lazarus, which is now going to be implemented statewide.

`Sea of Greed` is a book by Judge Douglas McCullough reflects back on the Manuel Noriega arrests.
amazon.com

  Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega was a infamous figure on the international stage during the 1980s. Before he became a caricature of the "crazy" dictator, he was on the payroll of the CIA and helped the United States gain information on Cuba.

The United States spends billions of dollars each year to fight the drug trade, but demand for illegal substances persists. Increasing acceptance of medical marijuana and horrific drug violence in Mexico are making many people skeptical about the “War on Drugs.” At the recent Summit of the Americas, leaders of some South American countries criticized the U.S. for its staunch support of the war. Is public sentiment moving us into an era without a war on drugs?

North Carolina Law Enforcement officials plan to crack down on methamphetamine labs in 2012. Jeff Tiberii has more.

Jeff Tiberii: Last year there were 331 illegal methamphetamine lab busts in North Carolina, an all-time high. The main ingredient in the drug is pseudoephedrine, which is found in Sudafed. Beginning this week all retailers will be hooked into a tracking system tracing pseudoephedrine purchases. North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper:

A new study from Duke University sheds more light on teen drug use. Researchers found Native American youths have the highest rate of drug use followed by whites, Latinos, African Americans and Asians. Dan Blazer is a professor of psychiatry at Duke and senior author on the study. He says drugs are a serious problem among 12 to 17 year-olds.