Downtown Raleigh

Downtown Raleigh
Mark Turner / Wikipedia

Residential builders are scrambling to keep up with demand for downtown housing in cities across North Carolina.

New apartment building projects are on track to double the number of housing units in the core of downtown Raleigh within a few years.

Bill King of the Downtown Raleigh Alliance says much of the demand comes from millennials and downsizing empty-nesters who want to be close to the action. King says there have been few options in the Triangle, which developed as a "suburban region".

An image of downtown Raleigh


Downtown Raleigh is booming and other downtown areas are noticing. According to a recent story in the Tampa Bay Times, Tampa should model its downtown after Raleigh’s tech-savvy and eco-friendly businesses, efficient mass transit and urban housing for young professionals.

Downtown Raleigh Skyline viewed from Boylan Ave.
Jmalljmall / Wikipedia

Raleigh restaurant owners will ask the City Council Tuesday to reconsider plans to charge $5 fees at downtown parking decks on nights and weekends.

Parking is currently free after 7 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday. The Council estimates it will cost $1 million to pay for security and maintenance at night, where public urination has become a problem.

Oakwood Lives!

May 27, 2015
Image of actors George Jack and Greg Paul performing in a production of Oakwood Lives!
Burning Coal Theatre

Oakwood Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 20,000 citizens, including notable community members and prominent state and national leaders. A collaboration between Burning Coal Theatre and Oakwood Cemetery honors the stories of some of the deceased each year through staged production.

A picture of the Duke Energy Performing Arts Center

The Duke Energy Performing Arts Center is seeking bids for a $10 million renovation project this summer.

General Manager Jim Lavery says the center needs to upgrade the women's restrooms, lighting throughout the building, paint, wallpaper, and the concession stand area. The money comes from Raleigh's General Debt Service fund.

"If you do 6-700 events a year, there's something going on every day. Our weekends are really, really full," Lavery says. "We're just trying to bring everything back to where it needs to be just because of the usage."

The Oakwood Inn Bed and Breakfast in downtown Raleigh
Jorge Valencia

Raleigh council members are continuing to debate how to manage the growing number of homes whose owners are listing on sites such as for short term rentals.

In a report he presented at a council meeting Tuesday, Raleigh Planning Director Travis Crane said the rental listings could represent additional income for property owners and the city, but can generate additional traffic and a parking crunch in residential areas.

Marbles Kids Museum
the museum

It's getting crowded at Marbles Kids Museum in downtown Raleigh.

Sally Edwards is president of the private not-for-profit. She says the museum built to accommodate 175,000 visitors a year, but now hosts 450,000.

“There are days that there are more people at the museum playing than the museum was designed to accommodate. So we really look forward to the opportunity to identify ways where we can expand, so the visitors who want to come and play and learn at Marbles have more room to spread out while they're here.”

A man out on a mission to hand his Walk [Your City] signage in Charleston.

Lots of cities cater to populations that prefer to drive.

A picture of three banjos.
plenty.r / flickr

Fans of bluegrass music are in Raleigh this week for the World of Bluegrass Festival and conference. 

The gathering is organized by the Nashville-based International Bluegrass Music Association.  The event is part business conference, part music festival.  

Nancy Cardwell is the IBMA's Executive Director.  She said some of the world's finest musicians are in attendance, too.

A picture of a rider on a motorcycle.
Donald Lee Pardue / flickr

The Capital City Bikefest kicks off in Raleigh this weekend.

The event will feature a classic motorcycle exhibit, a high wire stunt act and a biker fashion show. There also will be a ride to raise money for the U.S.O. and the U.S. Veterans Corps.

Kris Weiss is a spokesman for Ray Price Harley Davidson, which organizes the festival. He says the festival began when Raleigh launched efforts to revitalize downtown a decade ago.