Domestic Violence

Image of Host Frank Stasio, Avett Brothers' Cellist Joe Kwon, and SOT Producer Anita Rao
Charlie SHelton / WUNC

The year is coming to an end, and “The State of Things” staff is taking a moment to reflect on some of the year’s most memorable conversations. Producer Anita Rao’s favorite segments include a conversation commemorating Yusor Abu-Salha, one of the three Muslim students shot and killed in Chapel Hill in February.

The children's area in the lobby of the new Family Justice Center.
Catherine Johnson / Guilford County Family Justice Center

A Family Justice Center is opening today in downtown Greensboro and will offer a variety of services.

The new building will provide several types of support for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and elder abuse. Those services include law enforcement, legal, medical and social assistance.

Center Director Catherine Johnson said it is a benefit that the building is a one-stop spot for people dealing with these issues.  

Image of Allison Leotta, who wanted to show the ways the criminal justice system does and doesn't work in her books.
Allison Leotta

Allison Leotta was a federal sex-crimes prosecutor in Washington D.C. for more than a decade. Every day when she came home from work, she would think to herself, “I can’t believe what I saw today…someone should write about this.”

She began writing in the mornings before work and at night when she got home. In 2011, Leotta left the Justice Department to write full-time. She has now written four novels about a prosecutor named Anna Curtis, and people often refer to Leotta as “the female John Grisham.”

An image of a handgun
RabidSquirrel / pixabay

One morning this month, Kaaren Haldeman, an anthropologist in Durham, sent her three sons to school and drove to downtown Raleigh. There, down the hallways of the North Carolina General Assembly building, she led two mothers who were pushing babies in strollers.

“Have you been in this building much?” she asked them. “It's like a labyrinth.”

Laws Against Revenge Porn

May 8, 2015
North Carolina may join 16 states criminalizing "revenge porn."
Pixbay.com

North Carolina lawmakers are considering legislation to criminalize revenge porn- the distribution of sexually explicit images without the subject's consent.

The proposal would make it a felony to distribute certain kinds of revenge porn, also called nonconsensual pornography. Sixteen other states have criminalized revenge porn, but not all the laws are created equal, according to University of Miami law professor Mary Anne Franks

Image from Domestic Violence Awareness Month
Flickr/Herald Post

Public incidents in the NFL in the past year sparked a national conversation about domestic violence. But millions of Americans are struggling with this issue in private. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in four women and one in seven men in the United States will experience severe physical violence by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetimes.

UNC-Charlotte researchers say they have come up with an estimated cost of domestic violence in North Carolina.   The new study says eight key factors add up to approximately $307 million the state pays as a result of the crime. 

Image of Seema Kukreja as Udip, Robin Carmon Marshall as Anaba and Alexus Wilcox as Corrine in the play "From the Boot of Timberland".
Eric Barstow

A new family-run black theater company in the Triangle is presenting two companion one-act plays that encourage men and women to come together to address violence against women. 

Winston-Salem City Government has extended benefits to same-sex couples who were married in other states.
www.wxii12.com/

    

The Winston-Salem city government is now offering benefits to same-sex partners who are married. 

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