Dogs

Law
8:05 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Should Dogs Be Banned From Some Areas Of Raleigh Parks?

A proposed ordinance would ban dogs from Raleigh playgrounds and athletic fields.
Credit D. B. Brisbin

Raleigh's Public Works Committee will hear a proposed ordinance that would govern where dogs are allowed in parks.

City rules require that dogs be on a leash in all public places, and that their owners pick up their pets' waste. But Raleigh's parks department is still getting complaints about dogs running loose and threatening children.

Parks Superintendent Wayne Schindler says visitors also say they're finding dog droppings on ball fields.

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Science & Technology
2:00 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Is The Carolina Dog Native To North America? New Science Says: Maybe

Pittsboro resident Marielle Hare owns a dog, Oona, that she believes might have traces of Carolina Dog in her. She is interested in testing its DNA.
Credit Marielle Hare

The first Carolina dog that I. Lehr Brisbin took home with him smeared fecal matter all over the back seat of his car. He found her at a pound in Augusta, Georgia in the 1970s, and despite strong discouragement from the pound’s staff (they said she bit everyone who touched her), he managed to wrangle her into a carry crate in his back seat, where “she immediately had a diarrhea attack,” Brisbin recalls. But he was far from discouraged.  Brisbin wanted to take her home because he thought there was something strange and special about her. She resembled some wild dogs he’d seen in the woods along the Savannah River. And Brisbin was starting to put together an exciting hypothesis about why there were wild dogs in the South Carolina lowland that looked and acted different from most others.

At the time, I. Lehr Brisbin was a biologist studying wildlife at the Savannah River Ecology Lab, a field research station of the University of Georgia in Aiken, South Carolina. His research often took him into the 300 square mile wilderness of the Savannah River Ecology site. That’s where he first noticed the wild dogs.  They had long, pointy snouts, ears that permanently stood up and tails that curled back on themselves.  And their behavior, he noticed, was unusual, too. They dug small pits in the ground with their snouts. They hunted in packs and signaled to each other by flashing the white undersides of their tails. They moved as a pack, like wolves.  They were more like Australian Dingoes than European-bred dogs brought to America by colonists.  Brisbin hypothesized that the wild South Carolina dogs descended from canines that belonged to Native Americans, that the dogs’ ancestors had crossed the land bridge between Asia and North America with humans around 12,000 years ago.

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Politics & Government
5:30 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

North Carolina's First Lady Lobbies Against Puppy Mills

First Lady Ann McCrory supports a bill that would establish standards for commercial dog breeders.
Credit Jessica Jones

North Carolina's First Lady, Ann McCrory, is lobbying to get a bill passed at the General Assembly that would require large commercial dog breeding operations to adhere to minimum standards of care.

Commercial breeders with more than ten breeding females would have to provide food and water, daily exercise, appropriate housing, and veterinary care and humane euthanasia if needed. The measure has already passed the House with overwhelming bipartisan support. But it hasn't been brought to the floor by Senate leaders yet. In her first press conference since moving to the governor's mansion, Mrs. McCrory told reporters she hopes that happens soon.

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Politics & Government
5:01 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Puppy Mill Bill Passes State House

A Rhodesian ridgeback mother dog and her puppy.
Credit m_h via flickr, Creative Commons

The State House has passed a bill that would require basic standards of care for commercial dog-breeding operations.

The "puppy mill bill," as it's known, would apply to facilities with more than ten breeding females. Breeders would have to provide food and water, exercise, appropriate housing, vet care, and humane euthanasia if needed.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Sat April 27, 2013

The Triangle Foodie Scene Makes Way For Dogs

Dogs wait in line for treats from the Waggin' Wagon.
Credit courtesy of McKinney

The Triangle has some of the state’s most sought-after flavors: a recent slew of James-Beard Award semifinalists and Durham’s newest title, “Tastiest Town in the South,” have people chatting happily about the region’s good tastes.

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Politics & Government
5:50 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

The General Assembly Has Gone To The Dogs, Well At Least One

Diva is part of the General Assembly tour for visiting schoolchildren.
Jessica Jones

Many state legislators in the General Assembly aspire to be top dog, but few of them are as popular as the real deal: a miniature Pomeranian named Diva.

The fuzzy, four-pound lap dog with a personality to match her name comes to work at the legislature every day with the people she owns, Republican representative Nathan Ramsey and his wife, Robin Ramsey, who’s a legislative assistant.

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The State of Things
10:12 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Dogs Are Smarter Than You Think

The Genius of Dogs: How Dogs are Smarter Than You Think
Credit brianhare.net

Frank Stasio talks to Duke Associate Professor Brian Hare

The last ten years have seen a revolution in our understanding of dogs, and Brian Hare has led the way.

Hare is an Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University and the co-author – with his wife, Vanessa Woods - of “The Genius of Dogs: How Dogs Are Smarter Than You Think.”

“Everybody who has a dog is excited to tell you how smart they are,” he said on The State of Things. “But what science is able to contribute is that we compare dogs to other species and we’ve found that dogs are really remarkable.”

How remarkable?

Without training, Hare says dogs are able to learn words and make inferences. Some dogs learn words the first time they encounter them.

Dogs self-domesticated about 40,000 years ago, Hare says. “They chose us, so they got friendlier and they got smarter as a way to live with humans.”



Dogs are very good at solving problems on their own, but they may not be the heroic animals they are often made out to be in popular culture. Hare cites the “bookcase test” where a research project was done to test what dogs would do when its master was pinned under a bookcase and calling for help.

“The truth was, the dog didn’t run off and seek help,” Hare said. “In fact, the dogs just sort of stand around doing nothing.”

Hare has started a website, dognition.com, that will allow dog owners to play a series of science-based games that will reveal their dog’s unique abilities and help build a stronger dog/owner relationship.

Law
7:30 am
Thu May 31, 2012

Fayetteville Enacts Limits On Number Of Dogs

Fayetteville's city council has approved new dog limits. Starting July 1st, people living in apartments will only be able to keep two dogs, and people living on less than a half acre will be limited to three. Cumberland County approved the same ordinance earlier this month. Three council members voted against the measure, saying the city should focus on problem dogs. But Cumberland County animal control director John Lauby says the new restrictions will make people safer.

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Arts & Culture
1:20 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Bloodhound Training in Greensboro

Bloodhound Ellie Mae with her handler officer J.D. Fraser
Credit Jeff Tiberii

About 20 bloodhounds from across the country are in the Triad this week working to earn certification. Dogs and their handlers are receiving training from the National Police Bloodhound Association. Greensboro K-9 officer J.D. Fraser works with four-legged partner Ellie Mae. She is trained to assist in missing person searches. Officer Fraser says the re-certification process hones Ellie Mae's skills and gives credibility to the practice.

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