Diversity

Rescue personnel help injured people after a car ran into a large group of protesters after a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday.
AP Photo/Steve Helber

The events in Charlottesville over the weekend hit close to home for many North Carolinians. Debates over Civil War and Confederate monuments and the recent rise of white supremacists are certainly topics we’ve dealt with here in recent years. 

But for one woman from The Triangle, the deadly attack in Charlottesville was personal. Her name is Susan and we’re not including her last name because she fears reprisals from white supremacists.

Geoff Livingston / Flickr Creative Commons

Whether the result of uninformed reporting or newsrooms lacking in diversity, the media’s depiction of Muslims can be simplistic and inaccurate.

It sometimes presents Muslims as violent, extreme, and monolithic, creating a culture of fear and blame that victimizes them.

Diversity Low Among N.C. Charter Schools

Feb 2, 2016
At one point, only six percent of students at Central Park School for Children in Durham, NC qualified for free and reduced meals. After enacting a weighted lottery that prioritizes low-income families, that number is up to 18 percent. The goal is 40.
Reema Khrais / WUNC

Since the late 1990s, the racial diversity of North Carolina’s 158 charter schools has decreased with more institutions becoming predominantly white or predominantly minority.

In January, a draft of a state report on charter schools showed they were whiter and richer compared to traditional public schools. Advocates for charter schools say they offer an option for low-income families in low-performing schools. Opponents say they are slipping back into segregated systems.

Reema Khrais

In Durham’s Central Park School for Children, classrooms look and feel different than they did just a few years ago. Frankly, the charter school is not as upper-middle class or white as it used to be.

“There’s a greater diversity of viewpoints, there’s a greater diversity of perspectives,” Director John Heffernan explains.

Clarence Page
Keppler Speakers

Protests erupted on college campuses around the country this month as students called for racial and social reforms. At the University of Missouri-Columbia last week, the system president and university chancellor resigned after mounting tensions over race relations on campus.

A picture of summit participants at a table in 2014.
Innovate Raleigh

Area youth and minority leaders will rub elbows with representatives from large tech firms and start-ups at the fourth annual Innovate Raleigh Summit today.

The non-profit Innovate Raleigh works to connect entrepreneurs and resources. Executive Director Jenny Hwa says the organization will study whether it's a gap in education that limits diversity in the tech industry.

An image of hands raised
Creative Commons

  From Ferguson to Baltimore, events have unfolded across the country with race at center stage.

American media coverage has reported on protests and investigated lethal altercations between black males and police officers.

N.C. State University professor Rupert Nacoste's latest book is "Taking on Diversity."
makinggumbo.com

Rupert Nacoste served in the U.S. Navy during military race riots in the 1970s.

His commanding officers chose him to facilitate conversations about race relations among his fellow sailors. The experience prompted him to pursue a career as a social psychologist. 

Mayorga-Gallo's book explores the benefits of living in a racially diverse Durham neighborhood.
UNC Press

Researchers concluded long ago that segregated schools and neighborhoods were linked to racial inequality. “Separate, but equal” is a fallacy.

But Sarah Mayorga-Gallo wanted to find out if the converse is true. Is there a link between diverse neighborhoods and more racial equality?

She tried to answer that question by studying a racially diverse community in Durham. 

Her research is compiled in a book called Behind the White Picket Fence: Power and Privilege in a Multiethnic Neighborhood (UNC Press/2014).

A new study shows large corporate boards in North Carolina are less diverse than the boards of Fortune 100 companies. 

The U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned a lower-court ruling that dealt with student assignment in Pitt County Schools. The 4th Circuit said the school district that serves the Greenville area did not adequately consider race when drawing attendance boundaries.

Dave DeWitt: Pitt County is one of a handful of school districts in North Carolina that is still under a federal desegregation order from the 1970s. As such, any major changes it makes to student assignment must consider race.