Diabetes

Syringe
Jill Brown / flickr.com/photos/jill_a_brown/2629206800

A Danish pharmaceutical company broke ground on its second facility in Johnston County Monday. Novo Nordisk says the $1.8 billion plant will be built next to an existing company facility and share its infrastructure.

Site Director Gary Lohr says the new plant will manufacture the company's products, instead of just packaging them.

"We've been manufacturing diabetes medicines out of Kalundborg and out of our site Denmark facilities. and this is the first time we've actually moved it outside of Denmark."

An image of a 'smart' insulin patch
UNC School of Medicine/ UNC Health Care

Pricking your finger and meticulously checking your blood sugar could no longer be the only way people with diabetes handle the disease.  Researches from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and N.C. State University are working to replace this painful process with a thin square patch the size of a penny.

  

Tim Anderson grew up in north Raleigh as a gay, sugar-obsessed teenager.

A picture of insulin vials and a syringe.
.:[ Melissa ]:. / Flickr

A report from Harvard University says one-in-10 North Carolinians has diabetes, and that the disease will cost the state $17 billion per year by 2025.

Sarah Downer is a fellow at Harvard's Health Law and Policy Clinic. She said limited access to healthcare, nutritious foods and safe places to exercise are dangerous to communities.

North Carolina has the fifth highest rate of food insecurity, meaning people don't have regular access to nutritious meals. The state also ranks fifth for early childhood obesity.

Several Durham County groups are partnering to fight a high rate of diabetes in adults. The Durham Diabetes Coalition brings together health groups, churches and government to teach people about the dangers of the disease. County statistics show that 12 percent of Durham County adults live with diabetes. The statewide average is nine percent. Health educator Chasity Newkirk says the challenge is getting people screened, especially African Americans.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 5

Oct 16, 2007

As part of our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care" we’ve been reporting on the remarkable rise of Type 2 diabetes. That rise is due mostly to obesity; Emily Hanford traveled to two schools in eastern North Carolina to try to find out why it's such a problem -- and what's being done about it.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 4

Oct 15, 2007

Type-2 diabetes may be the plague of this century. Just 20 years ago, about 30 million people in the world had the disease. Today, it’s more than five times that many. It’s a frightening prospect for health, and the health care system. Here in North Carolina, diabetes is already a direct or contributing cause in one out of every five hospitalizations. That’s billions of dollars of every year. Experts say health care providers need more effective ways to treat diabetics so they don’t end up in the hospital. A group of clinics in eastern North Carolina is trying to do it with a new model for treating chronic disease.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 3

Oct 12, 2007

This week we're focusing on health care and the rise of diabetes in northeastern North Carolina. Yesterday we met Miranda Cofield, a 50 year old woman who recently lost her health insurance. She's African American, and she's poor. These factors put her at high risk of developing complications from diabetes. Statistically, Sterling Hamilton does not face the same risks.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 2

Oct 11, 2007

Today our look at diabetes in eastern North Carolina continues.

"Good morning, how ya doin? My name is Miranda Cofield. I live in Rich Square, NC and I am a 50 year-old patient with diabetes, type 2."

"I’m Sterling Hamilton, I live here in Conway, I’m a retired school teacher and administrator and I found out I had diabetes, Type 2, in 2000."

Sterling Hamilton and Miranda Cofield are both determined to beat their diabetes. But their experience with the disease has been very different. He gets a comfortable retirement income; she works part time as a school tutor. He has health insurance; she does not And he is white; she is black. These distinctions are significant when it comes to diabetes, and health. Emily Hanford reports for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Healthcare." She begins with Miranda Cofield.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 1

Oct 10, 2007

Today, as part of "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care" we begin a series of reports looking at the rise of diabetes and its impact on the state. Our stories focus on northeastern North Carolina where diabetes is taking a particularly harsh toll. We begin in Northampton County, east of Interstate 95 near the Virginia border. Northampton is one of the poorest counties in the state. If you live here, you are almost twice as likely to develop diabetes than if you live in an urban area and you’re more likely to die from it. Emily Hanford prepared this report.