Crossover

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in state politics, a conversation about crossover week, a decade's old legislative tradition in which a self-mandated deadline requires bills to advance from one chamber to another, or die.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Updated 11:50 a.m., 4/28/2017

Thursday's crossover deadline came and went with a bang. Debate got heated when House Minority Leader Darren Jackson (D-Wake) objected to a final vote on House Bill 113. The measure allows for private citizens to take their local governments and police departments to court for failing to comply with immigration law enforcement.

It was clear Jackson believed Republicans violated a bi-partisan agreement on which bills would get a final vote just ahead of the deadline--Jackson said HB 113 was not one of them. Nonetheless, Jackson backed down when it was clear he was being outmaneuvered by the GOP leadership. The bill survived crossover and moved on to the Senate.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

At the General Assembly it's "crossover week." That means lawmakers in Raleigh are scurrying about and busier than usual as they try to advance dozens of bills before a self-mandated cutoff for legislation to cross over from one chamber to the other.