Crime

Politics & Government
9:08 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Fayetteville Considers A Tax Hike To Cut Crime

Fayetteville is weighing the possibility of raising property taxes to pay for more crime-fighting measures.
Credit Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr

Fayetteville's city leaders are considering a property tax hike to fight crime. 

Officials say the proposed budget would raise taxes an average of $60 per year on a $150,000 house. 

Mayor Nat Robertson said the money would be used to put more officers on the street. 

“Our chief of police has asked us for 67 new employees,” Robertson said. “That includes 50-some-odd credentialed employees and support staff for them.”

Robertson stressed the spending plan is just a proposal, so far. 

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Law
5:59 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

NC Supreme Court To Consider Mandatory Life Sentences For Juveniles

Credit North Carolina Department of Public Safety

On Tuesday, the North Carolina Supreme Court will consider whether or not to allow parole for criminals charged with life sentences as juveniles before 2012.

The case is a response to the 2012 Miller v. Alabama decision by the U.S. Supreme Court. It held that mandatory life sentences without parole for juveniles were unconstitutional. The hearing in North Carolina is to determine whether or not to apply that decision retroactively.

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The State of Things
11:52 am
Tue April 29, 2014

Durham Police Chief Jose Lopez Addresses Recent Controversies

Durham Police Chief Jose Lopez
Credit http://durhamnc.gov/

In the last year, the Durham Police Department has faced public criticism surrounding search policies and three police-related deaths.  The NAACP of North Carolina questioned the police actions in the case of Jesus Huerta, a 17 year-old who died in police custody.

Advocacy organizations like the Southern Coalition for Social Justice and Fostering Alternative Drug Enforcement (FADE) have raised accusations of racial profiling.

The department maintains that racial discrepancies in crime statistics do not indicate discrimination. They issued a report in response to the criticism.

In response to public outcry, the Human Relations Commission will make recommendations to the City Council for procedural reforms in police governance in May. 

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The State of Things
12:13 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Witness To An Execution: Part Two

Execution chamber
Credit Wikipedia

Stephen Lich Tyler drove to Texas last week to witness the execution of his father’s killer, Ramiro Hernandez Llanas. Before he left, he spoke on The State of Things about his struggles with the decision to attend and his expectations of the execution. He returned to the studio today to talk with host Frank Stasio about the experience and how it shaped his perspective on the death penalty.

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The State Of Things
11:20 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Witness To A Texas Execution: Part One

Lethal injection room
Credit Wikipedia

On Wednesday night, the State of Texas executed Ramiro Hernandez-Llanas, a man convicted of the 1997 killing of professor Glen Lich.

Hernandez-Llanas was an immigrant hired to work on the Lich property when he lured Lich outside the home and beat him to death. He then returned to the house and attacked Lich's wife.

Lich was not Hernandez-Llanas's first murder victim. Hernandez-Llanas had escaped from Mexican prison where he was serving a 25-year sentence for murder.

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Education
7:10 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Crime, Dropouts, Suspensions Down In NC Public Schools

Credit Malate269 / Wikimedia Commons

Crime, violence, dropout rates and out-of-school suspensions declined across North Carolina public schools last school year, according to a report released by state education officials.

The report shows 10,630 reported acts of school crime and violence last school year, a 4.8 percent decrease from the 11,161 acts in 2011-12. The most common reported acts involve illegal possession of drugs or alcohol, weapons or assault.

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The State of Things
4:47 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

This Is Your Brain On Crime

Brain scan
Credit creative commons

In the future, neuroscientific evidence may be as prevalent as DNA evidence in the criminal justice system. Today on The State of Things, experts discussed the future of neuroscience and the law. Here are some highlights. 

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The State of Things
11:47 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Neuroscience And The Law

MRI brain scan
Credit creative commons

In the not so distant future, brain scans may be as prevalent as DNA evidence in the criminal justice system. This neuroscientific evidence has the potential to correct biases and predict criminal recidivism. But critics argue it could be misleading and difficult to refute. Exploring the brain as a means of assessing intent also raises privacy concerns. 

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The State of Things
11:48 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Wake County District Attorney Steps Down After Nearly Three Decades

Wake County District Attorney Colon WIlloughby
Credit http://web.co.wake.nc.us/ / Wake County District Attorney's Office

  

In his 27 years as Wake County’s District Attorney, Colon Willoughby has prosecuted everything from high-profile murder cases to corruption in state government. For Willoughby, integrity and impartiality are vital components of the role. 

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Politics & Government
7:14 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Criminal Defendants In North Carolina Could Waive Right To Jury Trial

The old Jackson County Courthouse in Sylva, N.C.
Credit Jimmy Emmerson via Flickr

North Carolina will move one step closer today to allowing people accused of a crime to waive the right to a trial by a jury of peers and instead choose to be tried by a judge.

A proposed constitutional amendment, which is scheduled for a public hearing March 17 in Raleigh, would allow any criminal defendant except for someone facing the possibility of death the right to waive a jury trial.

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