Creative Writing

Image of Adam Johnson, author of 'Fortune Smiles' and professor of creative writing at Stanford
Samson Yee

When Adam Johnson worked in construction, he heard all sorts of stories from his co-workers, some of whom were Vietnam veterans and others who were ex-cons. Johnson’s had his share of tales too, from visiting North Korea to a dangerous swim in an Arizona sewage pipe.

Mary Kratt in rhododendron at age 6
Mary Kratt

Historian and author Mary Kratt grew up in the countryside surrounded by trees, the occasional quail hunter and not much else. As a little girl she spent a lot of time on her own and became a keen observer of her surroundings and other people, and she says that’s exactly why she is a successful poet today. 

Kratt has authored six poetry books and a number of books and essays on Charlotte history.

Image of Amber Flora Thomas, a poet and creative writing professor at East Carolina University.
Amber Flora Thomas

Amber Flora Thomas was in many ways destined to be an artist. Her mother is a painter, her father was a sculptor, and they valued creativity more than almost anything else.

She spent most of her childhood in cars, tents and trailers as they traveled from art show to art show. And though she tried to stray from a creative career and pursue a degree in political science so that she could become a lawyer, she found that she was continually drawn back to writing.

Image of "Soon," the latest collection of short stories written by Pam Durban, a creative writing professor at UNC.
University of South Carolina Press

The characters of Pam Durban’s short stories face a variety of challenges on different fronts - grief, identity, interpersonal relationships.

But the common thread that binds them all is storytelling. Durban’s latest collection of short stories is Soon (University of South Carolina Press/2015).  

Host Frank Stasio talks with Durban, professor of creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Photo of poetry writing.
Flickr/Lorenzo Tomada


Triad poets are gaining local and national recognition for their creative approaches to poetry and poetry-inspired community work. 


Rev. Jasmine Beach-Ferrara is an ordained minister and published author who uses her faith work and fiction writing to create new strategies for supporting LGBT communities in the South.