Construction

A picture of a shadow of scaffolding.
Trapac / Flickr

There was a deadly construction accident Monday in Raleigh.  A number of men were working on an 11-story building in a busy section of downtown when the accident occurred.  

Witnesses say three men fell to their deaths and a fourth man was hospitalized when scaffolding buckled and collapsed.

John Boyette is a spokesman for the City of Raleigh.

“This involved a scaffold, a collapse of a scaffold.  So that seems to be what the investigation is centering on," said Boyette.

Some North Carolina legislators say they were surprised and upset to hear that their House Chamber is undergoing renovations.

They say they didn’t green light the $125,000 expense, and that it didn't go through the legislative services commission. The project received approval from the office of House Speaker Thom Tillis, who is transitioning to U.S. senator.

“Quite a surprise,” said House Republican Representative Julia Howard. “I am shocked that they’re taking the red curtains down, that’s a piece of our history. It does disturb me.”

Photo: A camera attached to a remote control airplane
Chris Goldberg / Flickr/Creative Commons

A series of laws passed by the General Assembly this summer will go into effect today, affecting areas of construction, pollution and privacy. The variety in legislation reflects the broad reach of the state House and Senate this year.

Coal Ash

A picture of City Market in the Moore Square Historic District.
jmturner / Wikipedia

Raleigh's Historic Development Commission is hosting a public meeting tonight about the city's historic preservation rules. Experts and the public will weigh in on the city's design guidelines for appropriate building projects in historic districts.

Martha Lauer is a city planner and also directs the Raleigh Historic Development Commission.

“The city would like to see changes in its local historic districts managed so that the character in each district is protected,” she said.

Martin Marietta Materials

Raleigh-based Martin Marietta Materials is moving ahead with its largest acquisition yet.  It is acquiring leading cement producer Texas Industries.

Martin Marietta is one of the largest U.S. producers of construction aggregates like crushed stone, sand and gravel.  Once the company formally merges with Texas Industries, it’s sure to be number one.

The $2.7 billion transaction couldn’t come at a better time, as housing and other construction is starting to bounce back.