Confederate Monuments

Lisa Philip / WUNC

The University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Board of Trustees held a public hearing Wednesday to gather opinions on Silent Sam. That’s the Confederate monument sitting near the entrance to the UNC campus that has become the focal point of protests and denouncements by students, faculty, and even entire university departments.

Protesters with the #DefendDurham movement outside the Durham County Courthouse
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

About two dozen protesters with the #DefendDurham movement called on District Attorney Roger Echols on Tuesday to drop criminal charges against nine people connected to the toppling of a confederate monument.

Durham County officials remove the Confederate statue that was pulled off its post by protestors.
Courtesy of Barry Yeoman

Durham prosecutors dropped all charges against three people accused of toppling a Confederate monument in Durham.

Charges against Alexander Caldwell, Taylor Cook, and Myles Spigner were dropped, according to their defense attorney Scott Holmes.

North Carolina Collection, UNC Chapel Hill / Wikimedia Commons

As many cities struggle to deal with their Confederate monuments, Greensboro has its own concrete legacy of white supremacy to contend with: Aycock Street was named after former governor and white supremacist Charles Aycock, whose name has already been removed from a Greensboro middle school and several other public buildings around the state.

The Women of the Confederacy monument was a gift to the state by Confederate veteran Col. Ashley Horne, and was unveiled in June 1914. It was the wish of Colonel Horne to recognize the suffering and hardship faced by women during this tragic period.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Three confederate monuments on the state capitol grounds will stay up for now.

Robert Lee IV, a descendant of Confederate General Robert Lee, speaks out against racism at the 2017 VMA's on 8/27/2017. Susan Bro, mother of Heather Heyer, appears on stage.
Matt Sayles / AP - 2017

Robert W. Lee IV is a North Carolina minister and descendant of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Robert W. Lee IV has made it his mission to counter the racist and problematic legacy of his ancestor by writing and speaking openly about the continued effects of racism in the U.S. 

The Old Well and flowers on the campus of UNC- Chapel Hill.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

The University of North Carolina has rejected a request by white nationalist Richard Spencer to speak on campus.

Durham County officials remove the Confederate statue that was pulled off its post by protestors.
Courtesy of Barry Yeoman

Three more people have been charged with toppling a Confederate statue in North Carolina earlier this month.

Police surround a Confederate monument during a protest to remove the statue at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C., Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017.
Gerry Broome / AP

Hundreds of people rallied Tuesday night at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill campus in opposition of a Confederate statue known as Silent Sam.

A crowd gathered at the 'Silent Sam' statue at UNC - Chapel Hill on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Updated 11:45 a.m., August 23, 2017

Three people are facing charges related to a demonstration against a Confederate statue at the University of North Carolina.

Confederate Monuments, Robert E. Lee, Duke Chapel, Duke University
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Confederate monuments have become flash points for a national debate about free speech, race and memory. Statues have been removed in more than a dozen states including Texas, Louisiana, Maryland, Florida and New York. 

The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee was removed from  the Duke University Chapel days after it was vandalized.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Duke University quickly and quietly removed a controversial statue from its most iconic building over the weekend.

Protesters hold a sign at an anti-KKK rally in downtown Durham on Friday, August 18, 2017.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Updated 5:13 p.m., August 18, 2017

Several thousand people marched in downtown Durham in a demonstration against racism on Friday afternoon.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in North Carolina politics, a conversation about unrest in Charlottesville; a Confederate statues comes down in Durham; and anti-white supremacists hold vigils across the Triangle. Meanwhile, Governor Roy Cooper calls for the removal of all Confederate statues across the state.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNC Politics Podcast, a conversation about unrest in Charlottesville, Va., the toppling of a Confederate statue in Durham and President Donald Trump's response to recent events.

A statue on the portal of Duke Chapel bearing the likeness of Confederate General Robert E. Lee has been vandalized.
William Snead / Duke University

Protesters on Thursday marched on the Durham County courthouse in support of the demonstration that brought down a Confederate statue, while a monument to Gen. Robert E. Lee was vandalized nearby at Duke University.

Battlescene from Civil War
Wiki Images / Wiki Images - Commons

 A new exhibit at the Rural Heritage Museum at Mars Hill University hopes to show people that the Civil War played out in North Carolina in complicated ways. 

Confederate Monuments, Charlottesville, Durham County Monument
Courtesy of Barry Yeoman

In comments posted online Tuesday night, Governor Roy Cooper called for the removal of all Confederate monuments from state property.

LEONEDA INGE / WUNC

Protesters toppled a confederate monument in Durham last night. The statue came down during a demonstration against the violence that erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia this past weekend.

Confederate Monuments, Charlottesville, Durham County Monument
Courtesy of Barry Yeoman

A crowd of people gathered in downtown Durham late Monday to witness the toppling of a long-time Confederate monument. 

Rescue personnel help injured people after a car ran into a large group of protesters after a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday.
AP Photo/Steve Helber

The events in Charlottesville over the weekend hit close to home for many North Carolinians. Debates over Civil War and Confederate monuments and the recent rise of white supremacists are certainly topics we’ve dealt with here in recent years. 

But for one woman from The Triangle, the deadly attack in Charlottesville was personal. Her name is Susan and we’re not including her last name because she fears reprisals from white supremacists.

Image of producer Andrew Tie
Charlie Shelton

As the year draws to a close, “The State of Things” is taking a moment to reflect on the highlights of 2015 with the program’s producers.

Producer Andrew Tie’s favorite segments include conversations about mass incarceration and another about confederate monuments on state grounds.

Thomas Brown studies landmarks of Confederate memory such as the flag, shown here flying at the South Carolina capitol before it was taken down this summer.
eyeliam / Flickr Creative Commons

The Confederate flag has been around for more than a century, yet the controversial symbol has been in the headlines almost every week this year. South Carolina removed the flag from their state grounds this summer after the shooting of churchgoers in Charleston, but the debate over Confederate symbols has continued across the nation.

Historian Thomas Brown has studied landmarks of Confederate memory around the country and examines what they can teach us about Americans’ changing political, social, and economic positions.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

Republican Sen. Thom Tillis skipped out on a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing about ISIS last week and instead met privately with former Vice President Dick Cheney. This follows Tillis’ loud campaign criticism of former Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan for her attendance record at meetings related to ISIS.

Meanwhile, Gov. Pat McCrory has signed a bill that widely protects Confederate monuments in the state.