Civil War

The Civil War is often referred to as the last war fought on American soil. Since then, we fight wars over seas and we watch the battles play out on TV or the Internet. For black and white women living in the American South, the Civil War was fought all around them, but the true enemies were poverty, hunger and despair. For those women, the battlefront was not a distant idea because the battlefront was the homefront. As part of our series, “North Carolina Voices: The Civil War,” Thavolia Glymph and Laura Edwards join host Frank Stasio to discuss what life was like for women in North Carolina during the war.

Did you know that Quakers were the first organized non-native religious group in the Carolinas? In the late 1600s, the governor and assembly of North Carolina were majority Quaker. Today, the Piedmont Triad has the largest concentration of Quakers in North America. But leading up to the Civil War, Quakers left the state in droves because of their opposition to slavery. During the war, their pacifism sent them north and west to free states. Greensboro’s Guilford College was first established as a boarding school in 1837 in order to maintain some Quaker presence in the state.

Michael Gerhardt
law.unc.edu

The 14th Amendment may be the most hotly debated 2,000 words in American history. It was adopted on July 9, 1868 and is considered the most important of the “Reconstruction Amendments.” Those amendments - the 13th, 14th and 15th - reconfigure the relationship between the states and the federal government. Among other things, they put the federal government in the position of monitoring the way states protect civil rights.

Civil War Monuments Loom Large

Jun 15, 2011
The Reidsville monument... without the statue.
Rose Hoban

All over North Carolina, statues of Confederate soldiers stand sentry in front of courthouses, churches and in public squares.
 

It was a dark and stormy night in Reidsville early on May 23rd...

Black Soldiers In The Civil War

Jun 14, 2011

Visualize a Civil War soldier and a sepia colored picture of a white man likely comes to mind. But thousands of African Americans in North Carolina served in the Union Army during the Civil War. They trained in the town of New Bern after its fall in March 1962.

Teaching The Civil War

Jun 13, 2011
Brick wall At Stagville
Dave DeWitt

The first public school in North Carolina was created in 1840. Before the Civil War, those schools were reserved only for Whites. And then, four years after the war ended, the system was revived.

Segregated schools were the law in the state for much of the 20th century. And as you might imagine, the Civil War was taught much differently depending on the color of the students’ skin.

Battle of Bentonville
UNC-Chapel Hill, NC Collection

  The site of the bloodiest battle in North Carolina history is now the location for a memorial to confederate soldiers. A ceremony tomorrow afternoon will recognize a long lost graveyard at Bentonville Battlefield State Historic Site. Derrick Brown is the assistant manager of the facility. He says an old photo and some new technology helped find the area where confederate soldiers were buried. 

Sgt. Furney Bryant, 1st NC Colored Troops
NC Dept. of Cultural Resources

A ceremony today in Wilmington is honoring black soldiers who served in the Civil War. A North Carolina Highway Historical Marker will be unveiled just outside the National Cemetery in the city. Jim Steele is the manager of the Fort Fisher State Historic Site. He says a combination of free blacks and former slaves participated in a fight to take the fort.

North Carolina was among the last Southern states to secede from the Union and the complex factors that led to the state's slow conversion to the Confederacy are more nuanced than history often remembers.

State senators have pardoned a Reconstruction-era governor who was impeached and driven from office nearly a century and a half ago.

150 years ago today shots rang out at Fort Sumter South Carolina, marking the beginning of the Civil War. In Charleston, Re-enactors will play out the day's events. Here in North Carolina, the state office of historical records will re-release documents that tell the story of the state's older confederate soldiers. The "Senior Reserves" were men between 45 and 50 years old who were drafted in the last year of the war.  Also, UNC Chapel Hill is launching a website, Civil War Day-to-Day.

A photo featured in the exhibit
ncdcr.org

North Carolina's role in the Civil War is the subject of a photo exhibit opening today in Fayetteville at the Cumberland County Public Library. "Freedom, Sacrifice and Memory" is a traveling show that will visit fifty public libraries across the state.

History buffs and students can keep up with what happened across the state during the Civil War through Twitter. The North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources is tweeting the words of North Carolina civilians who witnessed the events of the war.

LeRae Umfleet is organizing the project. She says diary, journal entries and letters are being used as sources for the tweets as part of the 150 year commemoration of the war:

A relic from the Civil War Battle of New Bern is back in North Carolina. The combat sword from one of the few female union soldiers to play a prominent role on the battlefield is in the hands of a local Civil War memorabilia dealer.

Will Gorges says Kady Brownell was credited with helping her Rhode Island regiment avoid friendly fire by climbing to high ground and using her unit's flag to wave off an attack from fellow union soldiers:

The Civil War began 150 years ago. As part of a four year commemoration, the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill is opening an exhibit today at Wilson Library. The display includes about one-hundred-sixty items that help tell the story of what happened in and around Chapel Hill and the University during the conflict. Susan Ballinger helped organize the collection. She says there are some very interesting documents to read:

reenactment
nchistoricsites.org

State and local officials are unveiling new artifacts today at the Alamance Battleground near Burlington. The items were found over the past year by archeologists, historians and volunteers. Bryan Dalton is the manager of the Alamance Battleground State Historic Site. He says discoveries include musket and cannon shot and other items.

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