Civil Rights

The State of Things
10:40 am
Mon June 13, 2011

Meet Heather Williams

Credit history.unc.edu

Heather Williams experienced racism for the first time when she moved to Brooklyn from Jamaica at 11 years old. That’s when she discovered that black was considered bad in the United States, though she didn't know why. Her high school library’s Black Studies section began her education in racial history. Her fascination with the subject would lead her to one day become a civil rights lawyer, and later, a teacher of history.

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Politics & Government
10:00 am
Wed June 8, 2011

Royal Oak Community Wants Justice

A group of African American residents in Brunswick County have taken their claims of environmental injustice to court. 

The Royal Oak community has a history going back to slavery.  Today, there are about 300 African American residents living in this unincorporated section of Brunswick County.  But their community also houses a waste transfer station, a sewage treatment plant, the animal shelter and the county’s only landfill.  Lewis Dozier is president of the Royal Oak Concerned Citizens Association.

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Arts & Culture
5:30 am
Wed May 18, 2011

Restoring Pauli Murray Home

The childhood home of a renowned human rights leader is about to get a major face-lift in southwest Durham.

 Pauli Murray was an attorney, Civil Rights activist and the first African American female Episcopal priest.  The house her grandfather built in the 1890s sits way off Carroll Street in Durham’s West End. Sarah Bingham was one of several people to walk through the two-story house yesterday. She says it’s in pretty good shape.

Sarah Bingham:  "I see possibilities everywhere."

Inge:  "It looks kind of fragile though."

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Education
5:05 pm
Mon May 9, 2011

UNC Civil Rights Center Targets Halifax Schools

Attorneys with the UNC-Chapel Hill Law School’s Center for Civil Rights say the three separate school districts in Halifax County are inherently unequal. 

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Arts & Culture
5:00 pm
Tue March 29, 2011

Margaret Turner Leaves Behind Civil Rights Legacy

Civil rights and labor leader Margaret Turner has died. She was involved in numerous struggles for civil rights in Durham. Turner played an important role in turning people out to events and speaking up at work and in the community.

State Senator Floyd McKissick knew Turner and says she was one of the “unsung heroes” of the movement:

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Arts & Culture
10:31 am
Thu February 10, 2011

Langston Hughes And Lynching

Book cover, 'Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture'

Host Frank Stasio talks to Miller about his new book, 'Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture.'

Writer Langston Hughes is famous for uplifting poems like "I, Too" and lyrical poetry like “A Dream Deferred,” but North Carolina State Assistant Professor of English Jason Miller says that hidden within Hughes' works are powerful statements about the practice of lynching. Host Frank Stasio talks to Miller about his new book, "Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture” (University Press of Florida/2011).

Arts & Culture
8:00 am
Fri December 17, 2010

Norman Rockwell And Civil Rights

Rockwell, `The Problem We All Live With,` 1963, oil on canvas, 36 x 58in., Illustration for Look, Jan. 14, 1964
Credit Norman Rockwell Museum Collection, NRM. 1975.1, Licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing, Niles, Ill.

"American Chronicles - The Art of Norman Rockwell" is currently on display at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Rockwell was meticulous in creating scenes of American life that were whimsical and idyllic. But during the latter part of his life - he took his work out of New England and captured the movement transforming the South - Civil Rights. Leoneda Inge reports.

American Chronicles – The Art of Norman Rockwell is currently on display at the North Carolina Museum of Art.  It has traveled the country since last Spring.  The exhibit includes some 40 original oil paintings – chronicling six decades of Rockwell’s work – and a complete set of more than 300 Saturday Evening Post covers.  Rockwell was meticulous in creating scenes of American life – whimsical and idyllic.  During the latter part of his life – he took his work out of New England and captured what was transforming the south – the Civil Rights movement.

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Politics & Government
8:00 am
Thu December 9, 2010

President Obama Signs Black Farmer Settlement

Black farmers in North Carolina and across the country are celebrating the signing of a bill authorizing payments to settle a racial bias lawsuit.

For decades – African American farmers have complained to the government about discrimination from the United States Department of Agriculture – or USDA.  With the stroke of a pen – President Barack Obama signed the Claims Resolution Act of 2010 – freeing up 1.15-billion dollars in settlement money. 

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