Civil Rights

Arts & Culture
5:46 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Change Of Step At Civil Rights Museum

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum opened in February, 2010. They will soon begin allowing self-guided tours for the first time.
Credit Jeff Tiberii

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro opened in February, 2010. For the first time, leaders of the facility say self-guided tours will be available.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum opened in Greensboro nearly three and a half years ago.  A national sit-in movement began on February 1st, 1960 at an F.W. Woolworth lunch counter on Elm Street, and today that site remains a commemoration and celebration of a chapter in American history.

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Education
11:30 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Duke Marks 50 Years Since Integration

Credit Duke University

Duke University celebrates 50 years of black students on Saturday, with an address by U.S. Senator William "Mo" Cowan.  The Massachusetts Democrat is a 1991 Duke graduate and one of two African-Americans currently in the U.S. Senate.

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The State of Things
11:54 am
Tue March 12, 2013

The Story Of Medgar Evers Through Collective Memory

Remembering Medgar Evers by Minrose Gwin
Credit University of Georgia Press

Author Minrose Gwin talks to host Frank Stasio about her new book, 'Remembering Medgar Evers' .

  Medgar Evers’s assassination was a spark that motivated social activists and inspired writers, poets and journalists. Artists like Bob Dylan, Eudora Welty and James Baldwin have contributed to the collective memory of Evers through their own works.

Minrose Gwin, professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, talks to host Frank Stasio about her new book, “Remembering Medgar Evers” (University of Georgia Press/2013).

Arts & Culture
8:01 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

A&T Four Celebrated 53 Years After Iconic Sit-in

Left to right: David “Chip” Richmond (son of the late David L. Richmond), Franklin McCain Sr. '63, Jibreel Khazan '63 & Joseph A. McNeil '63, standing in front of the statue commemorating the A&T Four.
Credit courtesy of North Carolina A&T State University RelationsA&T Four.

North Carolina A&T celebrates the A&T Four (or Greensboro Four) this Friday, the 53rd anniversary of their iconic sit-in at Woolworth's

Four civil rights pioneers will be honored Friday in Greensboro on the 53rd anniversary of their famous sit-in. North Carolina State University A&T Freshman Joe McNeil, Ezell Blair Jr., Franklin McCain and David Richmond sat down at an all-white Woolworth’s lunch sparking a significant movement in the Jim Crow South.

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State of Things
10:39 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Chapel Hill during the Civil Rights Movement

What did Chapel Hill look like during the Civil Rights Movement? Photographer Jim Wallace captured images for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s student newspaper, the Daily Tar Heel. But Wallace didn’t see fire hoses or police dogs turned on protesters.

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State of Things
12:15 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Who’s Responsible for Human Rights?

Last month, a conference in Greensboro brought together more than 70 attorneys, activists and average citizens to talk about human and civil rights violations at the hands of law enforcement. Among the issues discussed were racial profiling, police brutality, mass incarceration, torture and rendition. The event was a call to action and the message was that every member of society is responsible for speaking out about abuses of state power.

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Arts & Culture
6:10 am
Mon July 11, 2011

"Freedom Rallies" Honored in Williamston

The “Freedom Rallies” of 1963 were remembered and honored yesterday with a North Carolina Highway Historical Marker. 

The “Freedom Rallies” took place in the town of Williamston – in Martin County.  For 32 days – hundreds of mostly African Americans held mass meetings and marches, anchored at Green Memorial Church.  Diane Carr was 12-years-old during the “Freedom Rallies” and remembers singing and marching to the courthouse to demand equal rights.

Arts & Culture
7:00 pm
Fri July 1, 2011

Civil Rights Exhibit Online

The North Carolina Museum of History launched a new online exhibit today that takes a close-up look at the struggle for equal and civil rights across the state. 

As soon as you log onto the website – you are serenaded by Sam Cooke.  The name of the exhibit is “A Change is Gonna Come: Black, Indian and White Voices for Racial Equality.”  It covers the years 1830 to 1980 – from the Indian Removal Act to the rise and fall of Soul City.  Earl Ijames is the curator of the exhibit. He says it was going to be a physical exhibit before the 2008 recession.

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Arts & Culture
6:00 am
Mon June 20, 2011

African American Legacy in New Bern

A historic marker celebrates the life of James Walker Hood at Broad and George Streets in New Bern

Some historians refer to the Civil War as the “war between the states" – a white man’s war.  But to many people of color – it was the “war for freedom.” And during this mighty war, no other place in North Carolina had more “free” slaves than New Bern.

When the Union Army seized the city, word spread fast. Slaves travelled from across the state and outside its borders to get to New Bern.

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The State of Things
11:44 am
Wed June 15, 2011

State's Rights and the Reconstruction Amendments

Michael Gerhardt
Credit law.unc.edu

The 14th Amendment may be the most hotly debated 2,000 words in American history. It was adopted on July 9, 1868 and is considered the most important of the “Reconstruction Amendments.” Those amendments - the 13th, 14th and 15th - reconfigure the relationship between the states and the federal government. Among other things, they put the federal government in the position of monitoring the way states protect civil rights.

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