Civil Rights

The State of Things
10:09 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Greater Than Equal: African-American Struggles For School Integration

Credit UNC Press

  

The struggle for education equality in North Carolina was hard-fought for more than four decades.

It was not only a struggle for facilities that were equal to white schools, but a fight for integration and civic inclusion. Host Frank Stasio talks with Sarah Caroline Thuesen, author of “Greater Than Equal: African American Struggles for Schools and Citizenship in North Carolina, 1919-1965,” and a professor of history at Guilford College.

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The State of Things
12:27 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

50 Years Ago: The 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

The four girls killed in the bombing (Clockwise from top left, Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Denise McNair)
Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/76587168@N06/ / flickr.com

  

On September 15th, 1963, the Ku Klux Klan bombed 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The explosion killed four little girls and injured 22 others. In the violent aftermath of the bombing, two little boys were murdered.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Fri August 30, 2013

August 1963: Fred Battle Speaks About Getting Arrested In Greensboro

Fred Battle went to NC A & T in the 1960s and talks about his experience getting arrested for civil rights protests.
Credit Alexander Stephens

Today in our “August 1963” series, we hear from Fred Battle. Battle was a football star for the Mighty Tigers of Chapel Hill’s Lincoln High School, before being awarded an athletic scholarship to North Carolina A&T in Greensboro. It was there that his participation in civil rights actions expanded.

My name is Fred Battle, and in August of 1963 I was entering into my sophomore year at North Carolina A&T State University. And we were up in the D.C. area where we were playing Quantico Marines in a football game.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Thu August 29, 2013

August 1963: Millie Dunn Veasey, Former Raleigh NAACP President, Talks About Sit-Ins

Millie Dunn Veasey went to the March on Washington and was the first female president of the Raleigh-Wake NAACP.
Credit Alexander Stephens

Our “August 1963” series continues today with Millie Dunn Veasey. Veasey is 95 years old—she was born in Raleigh in 1918. During World War II, she served overseas with the Women’s Army Corps. Veasey returned home to attend St. Augustine’s College, where she worked as executive secretary to President James Boyer. While there, she became active in the Raleigh civil rights movement, eventually serving as the first female president of the Raleigh-Wake NAACP.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Wed August 28, 2013

August 1963: Howard Clement Remembers MLK At March On Washington

Howard Clement is serving his 30th and final year as a Durham City Council member this fall.
Credit City of Durham

Today in our “August 1963” series looking back at North Carolina at the time of the March on Washington, we meet Howard Clement. Howard, as his friends say, is one of the few people in Durham everyone knows simply by his first name. He first moved to Durham in 1961, shortly after finishing law school, to work as an attorney for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

August 1963: James Foushee Recounts A Hunger Strike In Chapel Hill

March 1964: the Holy Week fasters. James Foushee is on the far right. Others, from L to R, are Patrick Cusick, LaVert Taylor and John Dunne.
Credit Copyright Al Amon, From the John Ehle Papers (#4555), Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Our series, “August 1963,” continues to look back at North Carolina at the time of the March on Washington. Today we hear from James Foushee. As a teenager in Chapel Hill, he emerged as one of the leaders of the local civil rights movement.

My name is James Foushee. August of 1963, the 28th day, I was at the March on Washington in Washington, D.C.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Mon August 26, 2013

August 1963: Carrie Farrington Remembers Racism In Chapel Hill Schools

Carrie Farrington
Credit Alexander Stephens

Today we begin our series, “August 1963,” a look at North Carolina at the time of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. This week marks the 50th anniversary of the march, and producer Alexander Stephens asked North Carolinians to think back to August of ‘63.

My name is Carrie Farrington. In August of 1963, I was a rising seventh grader at Chapel Hill Junior High School.

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Arts & Culture
4:43 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

NC Residents Head To DC For 50th Anniversary March

Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking in Washington, DC.
Credit US Govt.

Busloads of people are headed to Washington, DC tomorrow to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington, and North Carolina will be well represented.

Andrea Harris was 15 years old in 1963 when Martin Luther King Junior gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.”

“The Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity," King said 50 years ago.

“I didn’t go then so I have to go now," said Harris.

Harris heads the North Carolina Institute for Minority Economic Development in Durham.

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The State of Things
12:15 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

The March On Washington, 50 Years Later

Program for the 30th Anniversary of the March on Washington
Submitted by Mandy Carter Bayard Rustin Commemorative Alliance

    

Five decades ago, more than 200,000 people from all over the country gathered on the National Mall to call for racial and economic equality. Next week, participants will once again gather in Washington to mark the anniversary of the March on Washington, a pivotal moment in American history.

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The State of Things
12:08 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Exploring The Life, Legacy And Unfinished Work Of Julius L. Chambers

Julius Chambers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Credit Citizenplastic / commons.wikimedia.org

In 1948, William Chambers, a black maintenance worker in Montgomery County, NC was denied payment for a job by a white customer. William Chambers spent many afternoons searching for an attorney to represent him, but all the white lawyers he asked refused. William told this story to his son, Julius Chambers, who then vowed to become a lawyer and fight for justice.

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