Chapel Hill

An image of the band Goodnight, Texas
Sideways Media

Patrick Dyer Wolf is from Chapel Hill. Avi Vinocur is from San Francisco. The musicians' hometowns are separated by almost 3,000 miles, but right in the middle is Goodnight, Texas. It is a small town of 28 people and the namesake of the duo's musical partnership.

An image of people holding up alcholic beverages
Pixabay Public Domain

The Chapel Hill Police Department is getting help from the North Carolina Alcohol Law Enforcement (ALE) to check whether bars are serving patrons under 21.

The partnership began before 20-year-old UNC student Chandler Kania caused a car accident on I-85 on Sunday, killing three people.

An image of North Carolina 'Welcome Sign'
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons

 

North Carolina has much to offer newcomers. From the coast to mountains and everything in between, the state is a place for food, fun and plenty of adventure. Where is the best barbeque? What is that accent? Who are the stars of bluegrass?

 

Below find five stories that highlight the Tar Heel state’s distinguishing qualities. And even if you’ve lived in North Carolina your entire life, take a look at the list of some of your state’s gems.

An image of Franklin Street in Chapel Hill
Wikipedia / Creative Commons

 

It's tough covering everything Chapel Hill and Carrboro have to offer in just 36 hours. The New York Times stopped by a few local spots like Neal’s Deli and the Ackland Art Museum when it recently visited the area.

 

Jonathan Howes
UNC-Chapel Hill

Former Chapel Hill Mayor and North Carolina public servant Jonathan Howes died Sunday.

Howes, 78, held several prominent government positions at the local, state and federal levels. He served in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development during the Kennedy administration, he was Secretary of the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health and Natural Resources under Gov. Jim Hunt, and he spent 23 years as director of the Center for Urban and Regional Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

An image of Franklin Street in Chapel Hill
Wikipedia / Creative Commons

Update: Read a summary detailing some of your feedback about places not mentioned in the New York Times article.  

The Core design.
UNC-Chapel Hill

UNC-Chapel Hill is planning a performing arts lab, studio and theater on Franklin Street.

Chancellor Carol Folt says the University has committed $4 million in non-state funding to build the $5 million facility.

Folt says "The Core@Carolina Square" will allow university departments and the public better access to works in progress. But she says it won't compete with the existing performance spaces on campus.

"We bring symphony orchestras and ballet companies. They don't come and practice in front of our town's children," Folt says.

The office of The Sun magazine in Chapel Hill. The Sun celebrated its 40th anniversary last year.
Rachel J. Elliott

“The Sun” magazine has been a Chapel Hill institution for more than four decades. It started in 1974 when editor and publisher Sy Safransky borrowed $50 to get the magazine started. Safransky had no idea where he would find funding to keep the production afloat, but he was confident that his vision for a “personal, political, and provocative” magazine would bring together readers and writers alike.

South Estes, Public Housing, Chapel Hill
Leoneda Inge

A big step is underway to help bridge the “digital divide” in Chapel Hill.

Town officials announced today, along with AT&T, that residents living in eight of its public housing communities will soon have free internet service.

The move is a long time coming, especially in a town that is already one of the most wired in the state.

The South Estes Public Housing Community in Chapel Hill sits right off 15/501, near University Mall.  The 44 units were built in 1970, are gray in color and probably need a little fixing up. 

Eighth-grade students Yasmine Boufedji, Angelycia Bogart, Dunya Alkaissi, and Nassir Jordan.
Reema Khrais

As principal Mussarut Jabeen makes her way to the playground, two very young girls run to her, pleading for undivided attention. The first shows off a temporary henna tattoo.

“Oh look at your henna, it’s so pretty,” exclaims Jabeen, principal of Al-Iman, a private Islamic school in Raleigh.

The other girl has just fallen and scraped herself.

“Oh, my little,” Jabeen says. “How about we wash it?”

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