Cardiology

An older couple snuggles.
Ian MacKenzie / Flickr

It's not your imagination; some people really do age more slowly than others.

Duke researchers have analyzed a long-running study of a thousand people born the same year in Dunedin,  New Zealand.

A picture of a blood pressure cuff.
Medisave UK / Flickr

Doctors often start treating patients for high cholesterol after age 55. But new research from Duke University shows each previous decade of high cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease 39 percent.

Bio-statistician Michael Pencina is a lead author of the report.

“Higher level of cholesterol in the 30s and 40s, still leads to increased risk of cardiovascular disease at age 55.”

Several state organizations are banding together give churches the tools to save lives.

Gurnal Scott: State Representative Becky Carney of Charlotte will never forget April 2nd, 2009, the day a portable defibrillator revived her after a near-fatal heart attack at the General Assembly

Rep. Becky Carney: One story can propel a great movement within a community.

One North Carolina hospital is using a new device to help patients who have congestive heart failure.

Wake Forest Baptist health is the first hospital in the state implanting the dual ventricular lead. In laymans terms it’s a more advanced pacemaker. The small device will help hearts pump more blood and with a better rhythm. Dr. Glenn Brammer is a Cardiac Electro Physiologist. He says this device also has 10 internal vectors that allow physicians options after the procedure. 

Duke University researchers are recommending a simple test to determine whether newborns have a serious health concern. About one percent of all babies are born with congenital heart disease. But spotting the problem early can be difficult. Doctor Alex Kemper is an associate professor of pediatrics at Duke. He says there is an easy way to help pinpoint the problem.

Recently, researchers at Duke published a study looking at implantable cardiac defibrillators in patients and determined that one fourth of patients receiving them didn’t need them. For the past few years, researchers at UNC have been doing head to head analyses of older versus newer psychiatric medications, and they’re finding many patients have more success with older, cheaper drugs.

heart illustration
Vintage Collective, Flickr Creative Commons

Too many cardiac patients are getting internal defibrillators when they don't need them - that's the result of new research from Duke.