Campaign

Photo of Mike Pence and Pat McCrory
Evan Vucci / AP

With a little more than three months until the 2016 elections, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is facing strong backlash—even from some fellow Republicans—​against his latest verbal onslaught, in which he attacked the parents of a fallen soldier.

The controversy comes as Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton opens a sizable post-convention lead in most polls. Will this latest controversy affect Trump's chances in North Carolina? And what effect could it have on Gov. Pat McCrory, who has campaigned with Trump in the state?

The modern day race for political office includes a series of competitions for endorsements and money. And the race for chief executive of North Carolina is no exception.

Republican Governor Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper have each raised millions of dollars in advance of a gubernatorial election that is expected to be among the closest in the country.

Election placards placed near a polling location in Apex, N.C.
Magnus manske / Wikipedia

A new study from High Point University questions the effectiveness of political lawn signs. 

Researchers say millions of dollars are spent on the signs across the country each election cycle.  Brandon Lenoir  is an assistant professor of Political Communication and Campaigns at the university.

"We actually found that unless the race is, is within only a percentage or two point spread between the two candidates, lawn signs have no effect on the outcome of the election."

a teacher in a classroom
Bart Everson / Flickr/Creative Commons

A Senate committee approved a plan on Wednesday that would keep school employees from taking part in political activity during work hours.

Senate Bill 480 would prohibit school employees from campaigning for office while they're on the job or using any work resources, like telephones or computers, for political reasons.

Bill sponsors say state employees already follow similar rules, and that the measure is intended to mirror them. Currently, North Carolina’s 115 school districts abide by different rules for its employees.

Photo: The Goodwin House
North Carolina Democratic Party

The new executive director of the North Carolina Democratic Party is looking to revamp how the party raises money -- as it faces more than a year of leadership turnover, fundraising troubles and distancing from the re-election campaign of U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan.

It’s one week until election day. Candidates for offices at all levels are crisscrossing the state, looking for any last stray votes they can find.   But the two major-party candidates for President, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, are not, as of now, scheduled to appear in North Carolina before next Tuesday.  However, that doesn’t mean their campaigns in the state are slowing down.

Lieutenant Governor Walter Dalton has officially announced his campaign for governor.

Jessica Jones: Dalton kicked off his campaign in a refurbished warehouse in downtown Durham. Mayor Bill Bell introduced Dalton before an enthusiastic crowd of supporters and some state lawmakers. The lieutenant governor says the city's drive to restore old buildings to make space for new businesses and industries symbolizes what the state needs to do to succeed.