Business

SEUS NC
Leoneda Inge

The business-to-business matchmaking continues today at the Raleigh Convention Center where the leaders from southern states and regions of Canada will try to make deals.

It’s the first time the Southeastern U-S Canadian Provinces Alliance or, "SEUS CP," has met in North Carolina.  

The kick-off to the conference had fingers snapping and heads rocking as musicians jazzed up the meeting room, welcoming dignitaries to the conference.

Seeking A Fortune Through Search Funds

May 5, 2014

Alex Livingston graduated from Harvard Business School last year. He was offered a pretty sweet job at a startup, but he turned that down in favor of something a lot more ambitious.

He's 27 years old, and he wants to be a CEO, not in 15 years but now. He and his business school classmate, Eddie Santillan, knew they wanted to run a company together. They just didn't know which company. So they went to investors and asked them to be their partners — to give them some money so they could find a company to buy. If the company did well, the investors would, too.

Weeks after issuing recalls for safety problems in some of its most popular cars, GM says it needs to fix defective fuel gauges that can give SUV drivers little or no warning their vehicle might run out of fuel. GM's latest recall potentially affects 51,640 SUVs that were built in 2013.

A picture of a woman using a tablet next to the SAS Analytics U logo.
SAS

A Cary-based software company is offering a free service to university students and professors.

SAS Analytics U will allow them to use statistical tools to manage data, identify trends, and make decisions in their research and class work. Analytics U also allows them to share their work in online communities.

In the Meantime Temporality and Cultural Politics
dukeupress.edu / Duke University Press

  

The idea that the world is getting faster is fairly common claim but what does that really mean?  How does our perception of time affect our bodies and our communities? Sarah Sharma, professor of media and cultural studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, examines how labor changes the way people experience time. 

Greensboro City Council
City of Greensboro

In a unanimous vote, the Greensboro City Council agreed Tuesday that its definition of a sexually-oriented business was too broad.

The problem stems from some businesses not realizing they were sexually-oriented. Spencer's, (the black light infused, sort-of-ironic t-shirt and chain wallet store often found in malls) was cited by the city as violating it's definition of "sexually-oriented." Of course, Spencer's pushed back, arguing that the items in its store that are explicitly for adults can also be found in a drug store.

NC Department of Commerce

Big changes are coming to the state commerce department.

A new public/private non-profit will be taking over some of the duties of recruiting new business to the state next year. But critics of the N.C. Partnership for Prosperity say similar efforts in other states have failed. Host Frank Stasio talks to 

   about the controversy.

Wood Pellets
Credit: Wikimedia

  The European Union recently set an aggressive goal for 20 percent of its energy to come from renewable sources by 2020. They turned to the American South as the primary supplier of wood pellets, a renewable alternative to coal. But some environmentalists claim pellets are not a viable carbon-neutral resource and the pellet industry is fostering environmentally hazardous logging practices.

Downtown Raleigh Skyline
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tsolson / flickr

North Carolina's technology and finance industry is attracting a Wall Street firm to the Triangle. 

The company Ipreo says it plans to hire 250 employees at an office in Raleigh by 2017.  Ipreo got nearly $4 million in incentives from the state in exchange for meeting hiring and investment goals in North Carolina. 

Ipreo president and COO Kevin Marcus says the growing firm wants to recruit analysts from nearby universities.

"We want to be able to attract talent and have a steady stream available to us," Marcus says.

Cover of 'Business Secrets of the Trappist Monks' by August Turak.
Columbia Business School Publishing

Augie Turak is a successful businessman with two software companies under his belt. For the past 17 years, he’s studied the business strategies of a group of Trappist Monks living in South Carolina.

Pages