Bill

Education
4:39 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

House, Senate Leaders Agree On Bill To Repeal Common Core

Credit Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

House and Senate negotiators have agreed on a bill that could replace parts – if not all – of the Common Core academic standards in North Carolina.

The two chambers drafted separate bills earlier this session that would create commissions to review the English and Math standards. The House bill recommended flat out replacing the standards, while the Senate legislation left open the possibility that parts of Common Core could continue.

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Education
5:16 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

NC Senate Pushes Forward Sweeping Regulatory Reform Bill

Credit Dave DeWitt

  The North Carolina Senate has tentatively passed a sweeping, 62-page bill that would make several changes to state regulations.

The proposal includes provisions that cover a lot of ground – everything from banning cursing on the highways to increasing penalties for parking in handicapped spaces or for violating endangered species.  

Many Senate leaders say the bill is meant to make state rule-making more efficient, while increasing protections for the environment and public.

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Education
6:00 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Bill Which Would Allow Students To Attend Any Public School Postponed

State lawmakers voted on Monday to postpone a bill that would allow North Carolina students to attend any public school in the state, noting that more study is needed.

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Education
8:45 am
Fri April 25, 2014

NC Lawmakers Propose Repeal Of Common Core Standards

Fourth-grade teacher Rosalyn Bailey explains a math assignment to her students at Hubbard Elementary School in Nash County.
Credit Reema Khrais

State lawmakers say they’re hoping to throw away the Common Core standards and replace them with North Carolina’s own education standards.

In a legislative study committee on Thursday, lawmakers proposed a bill that would create a review commission to rewrite the academics standards by December 2015. 

The Common Core standards, initially adopted by 45 states, set high, rigorous goals for what students across the country should be able to do. Supporters of the national standards say they raise the bar in terms of what students should know – that they’re more rigorous.

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