Bev Perdue

Governor Bev Perdue
NC Governor's Office

A year after leaving office, former Governor Bev Perdue is returning to the public stage with the launch of a new project focused on digital learning. 

In partnership with Wyoming Gov. Jim Geringer, Perdue founded the Digital Learning Institute, dubbed DigiLEARN. She says the idea is to bring together teachers, policymakers, entrepreneurs and students to develop the most effective digital learning tools.

North Carolina's new Secretary of Health and Human Services says she's committed to helping residents of group homes find a place to live at the end of the month. About 14 hundred people with mental illnesses or developmental disabilities are no longer eligible for Medicaid reimbursements for personal care services.

The outgoing Governor, Bev Perdue, allocated one million dollars from a rental assistance fund to keep remaining group home residents in place until the end of January. But everyone's aware that money will run out, says Secretary Aldona Vos.

Pat McCrory holds his first cabinet meeting today after becoming the 74th governor of North Carolina. McCrory took the oath of office over the weekend from Chief Justice of the state Supreme Court Sarah Parker. McCrory received a state seal from Bev Perdue that is handed to each governor when he or she takes office.

Today was the last full day of Democratic Governor Bev Perdue’s four-year term as the highest office holder in North Carolina. As the state’s 73rd governor, Perdue came into office fighting an uphill battle against a bad economy. She became a lightning rod for criticism from Republican state legislators. But she also served as an inspiration for women as North Carolina’s first female governor.

Gov. Bev Perdue was the first female governor in North Carolina history. Her tenure has been tumultuous and culminated with her deciding not to run for a second term. What is her legacy? Host Frank Stasio talks to News & Observer political reporter Rob Christensen; and Scott Mooneyham, editor at The Insider.

A group of people who say they were wrongfully convicted of arson more than forty years ago in Wilmington are asking Governor Bev Perdue for an official pardon before she leaves office. The “Wilmington Ten,” as they are known, served prison time for an arson that took place as race riots inflamed the city. The convictions were later overturned by the Fourth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. But the state of North Carolina has not pardoned the group.

Raleigh is on its way to having a destination park like New York's Central Park and Chicago's Millenium Park. The Council of State voted earlier today six-to-2 to approve leasing the state-owned Dorothea Dix property to the City of Raleigh for 75 years. The City will pay 5 hundred thousand dollars a year, with a 1-point-5 percent annual increase.

Some Republican legislative leaders have criticized the deal, most notably Senate President Phil Berger. He says he's considering legal action to terminate the lease. But Governor Bev Perdue says Berger and other opponents are misguided.

Dorothea Dix Hospital
wral.com

On Tuesday, the North Carolina Council of State is expected to vote on the future of the Dorothea Dix campus. The 300-acre former mental hospital is prime real estate. Gov. Bev Perdue appears on the verge of making a deal to sell or offer a long-term lease to the city of Raleigh for a "destination park." But not everyone is excited about that prospect, including the Governor-Elect Pat McCrory. WUNC Reporter Jessica Jones joins Host Frank Stasio to discuss the deal and its prospects.

State officials have decided to choose a health exchange option that is a state-federal partnership. The Affordable Care Act requires states to declare by tomorrow whether they want a federal or hybrid exchange. Governor Bev Perdue announced the choice today in a news conference broadcast by News 14 Carolina, saying it's the best arrangement for the state to pursue right now.

Governor Bev Perdue plans to shift 20 million dollars into funding for the state's pre-kindergarten academic enrichment program.

Governor Bev Perdue gave an early-evening welcome to delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte.

Perdue appeared yesterday -- not so much as a political force -- but as a gracious, and at times excited host.

Gov. Bev Perdue: "Do we know how to have a party? Go Democrats!"

She struggled with a strained voice through most of her five minutes on stage. Still she quickly settled into the party's talking points. Perdue has always been an advocate for education.

There must be something in the water in Craven County, NC. North Carolina’s first female governor, Bev Perdue, got her start there, as did the state’s first African-American President Pro Tem of the House, William Wainwright.

Governor Bev Perdue has cleared her desk of the remaining bills from this summer's legislative session.

Governor Bev Perdue has signed a bill helping military spouses find an easier path to work.

Family, colleagues, and state officials gathered Tuesday to honor the four North Carolina Air National Guard members killed while fighting a wildfire. The memorial service was held at the 145th Airlift Wing's base in Charlotte. Governor Bev Perdue hailed the men as heroes who gave their lives to protect others.

Bev Perdue: We celebrate their great love today for their spouses and their children, for their families and their friends, and for the communities they called home: Boone, Mooresville, Belmont, and Charlotte.

Governor Bev Perdue has vetoed the budget sent to her by the Republican-led General Assembly. This marks the second year in a row the governor has used her veto stamp on a legislative spending plan. Perdue said this morning in a news conference that she was willing to compromise but was rebuffed by the GOP leadership.

Governor Bev Perdue has vetoed legislation that would roll back the Racial Justice Act.

Lawmakers are preparing to wrap up their legislative session as they wait to see what Governor Bev Perdue will do with the budget they passed last week.

State Senate leaders have unveiled their budget proposal. Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger says the $20.1 billion-dollar plan contains adjustments that allow more money to be replaced in medicaid. But the Senate version spends nearly $130 million dollars less than the House budget on education. One place the Senate budget does spend money is on the Republican's Excellence in Public Schools Act that Berger sponsored.

The State Legislature has reversed course on how many low-income four-year olds are eligible for pre-kindergarten programs.

Dave DeWitt: As part of its effort to cut costs and streamline pre-k programs in the state, the Legislature last year appeared to cap the number of low-income kids at 20 percent. Proponents of Pre-K programs brought the case before Judge Howard Manning, who ruled that the law was unconstitutional. He ordered the state to admit all eligible at-risk four-year olds.

A bill that would introduce Las Vegas-style live gambling to the Eastern Cherokee reservation has tentatively passed the House. Governor Bev Perdue struck a deal with leaders of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, but lawmakers must change state law in order for the arrangement to move forward. Republican Thomas West is a sponsor of the bill.

Governor Bev Perdue has issued an executive order creating a task force to develop regulation for the controversial natural gas drilling practice known as fracking.

One year ago today, tornadoes tore across North Carolina leaving death and damage in their wake. While many areas are continuing to recover, some have made the long journey back, better than ever. 

Gurnal Scott: April 16th 2011, much of North Carolina got an up close and personal look at Mother Nature’s fury.

Weather Service: The National Weather Service in Raleigh has issued a Tornado Warning for Northern Nash County, Northeastern Franklin County.

State officials say they have a plan to close a huge shortfall in North Carolina's Medicaid budget.

There’s a renewed fight over education funding. Dave DeWitt reports that the loss of federal stimulus money has republicans and democrats picking sides ahead of the legislature coming back to Raleigh.

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