Bennett Place

Civil War, HB2, Race, Bennett Place
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

When you look closely, what does the face of North Carolina look like?

 Some say North Carolina, one of the fastest-growing states in the nation, is facing an identity crisis. And the controversy surrounding House Bill 2, the new state law that limits transgender access to bathrooms, hasn’t helped the state’s changing identity.

Colored Troops
Leoneda Inge

Events commemorating the 150th Anniversary marking the end of the Civil War are wrapping up across the south.  It is noticeable that most of the visitors attending these events are white.

But organizers at the Stagville State Historic Site in Durham made sure their event over the weekend would be more diverse.  They say “Freedom 150” focused on the lives of the former slaves once the Civil War came to an end.

An image of the Stagville barn
UNC

Events commemorating the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War are wrapping up. Organizers will mark the freedom of hundreds of slaves after the war Saturday, May 30, at the Stagville Historic site in Durham.

The event is called “Freedom 150.”  Jerome Bias sits on the Historic Stagville Foundation Board.  He says they are trying to make sure slavery is not forgotten.

Historian and Civil War reenactor Philip Brown.
http://www.ncdcr.gov/

April 9, 1865 is widely known as the day the American Civil War ended.

Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee handed his sword over to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox, Va.

But 89,000 of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's men were still scattered across the South, willing and able to continue fighting the North. 

Bennett Place, Civil War
www.ncdcr.gov

Thousands of history buffs are expected to visit the Bennett Place State Historic Site this week in Durham.  150 years ago, Confederate and Union generals met at the Bennett farm to negotiate a big surrender of troops.

But did this event essentially mark the end of the Civil War?  It’s according to who you ask and where they’re from.

The Bennett family farm was close to 190 acres of corn, wheat and oat.  Today, about 35 acres of the original farm is left and much work and money has gone into restoring and preserving the site.