Barack Obama

Mitt Romney won North Carolina last night. But the 15 electoral votes that went with it did not lead to the presidency, as Barack Obama was re-elected.  As Dave DeWitt reports, the presidential race in North Carolina came down to a slim, but significant, margin.

First lady Michelle Obama was in Charlotte this afternoon to help get out the vote for her husband. She reminded supporters waiting in a hangar at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport that President Obama won North Carolina in 2008 by only 14 thousand votes. Mrs. Obama said that's why every vote matters.

Michelle Obama: And it is all going to come down to what happens in just a few key battleground states like right here in North Carolina. Right here. When we win this state with your help and we'll be on our way.

Eric Hodge: Former President Bill Clinton visited Raleigh on Sunday. He was here to campaign for Barack Obama in what is shaping up to be a very tight race in North Carolina.

The Obama and Romney Campaigns continue to fight for North Carolina's 15 Electoral College votes.

It’s one week until election day. Candidates for offices at all levels are crisscrossing the state, looking for any last stray votes they can find.   But the two major-party candidates for President, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, are not, as of now, scheduled to appear in North Carolina before next Tuesday.  However, that doesn’t mean their campaigns in the state are slowing down.

Some members of Congress were in the Triangle today to back their candidates for President.

Gurnal Scott: 2008 GOP nominee John McCain came to a Cary VFW post to ask veterans to vote for Mitt Romney. He said his worries about President Barack Obama began the night Mr. Obama beat him four years ago.

John McCain: I was concerned about obviously national security. We always are. But I wasn't as concerned as I am today. America is not leading. We are beset by enemies on all sides.

The second night of the Democratic Convention in Charlotte was highlighted by a rousing speech from former President Bill Clinton. But it also featured a number of North Carolina connections, including remarks by former Governor Jim Hunt. As Dave DeWitt reports from Charlotte, the event is showcasing the state and its largest city.

A bill that helps military families harmed over 30 years by water at Camp Lejeune will become law today.

The Supreme Court's decision to uphold President Obama's healthcare overhaul sparked a range of reactions across North Carolina.

Tanner Latham: A rally to celebrate the Supreme Court's decision on Obama's healthcare law was held Thursday at Gaffney Health Services on Albemarle Road in East Charlotte.

The President's health care law survived a crucial test in the Supreme Court today. But, experts say the political fight isn't finished.

Asma Khalid: The Supreme Court voted 5-to-4 to uphold most of the Affordable Care Act. That surprised Karen Duqette. She works at the Republican-leaning Civitas Institute.

Karen Duqette: I think this decision is going to have a major impact on rallying conservatives.

Jonathan Oberlander agrees. He's a professor of health policy at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill