Animals

The State of Things
11:42 am
Wed October 9, 2013

The Nifty Noses Of Forensic Canines

Credit catwarren.com / catwarren.com

Cat Warren is a North Carolina State University professor by day and a superhero by night. Well, sort of. Her dog Solo is a cadaver dog. Warren takes him out to suspected crime scenes to help police find the bodies of the missing and presumed deceased.

The hobby started innocently enough as a way to keep Solo’s energy in check. He wasn't very well behaved, and he flunked out of obedience school a number of times.

“He was a singleton, so he didn’t relate well with dogs," Warren said on The State of Things.

Read more
Environment
11:06 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Ram Named 'Bubba' Still On The Loose In Durham

Bubba the ram has been spotted several times in Durham in the past week. He's still on the run.
Credit Steve Sbraccia, WNCN News

There’s a ram on the loose in Durham County whose escape tactics have outsmarted capture attempts by the Durham County Sheriff’s Office, a man with a tranquilizer gun and a local veterinarian with a lasso. The animal was first spotted near Odyssey Drive in Durham on Monday afternoon, August 25, and is thought to be a either a Barbados/Mouflon sheep or a Toggenburg goat. Deputy Paul Sherwin with the Durham County Sheriff’s Office was one of the officers who responded to Monday's call.

Read more
The State of Things
11:29 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Connecting The Dots On the News Roundtable

A baby olinguito in La Mesenia Reserve in Colombia.
Credit Luis Mazariegos

A new carnivore was discovered in Latin America.  Bradley Manning was sentenced for leaking government secrets while Edward Snowden was on the run for a similar crime.  And a look back at the March on Washington sparked a conversation about civil rights in the Middle East.  Host Frank Stasio discussed a wide range of issues and their common threads with the news roundtable.

Read more
Science & Technology
2:00 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Is The Carolina Dog Native To North America? New Science Says: Maybe

Pittsboro resident Marielle Hare owns a dog, Oona, that she believes might have traces of Carolina Dog in her. She is interested in testing its DNA.
Credit Marielle Hare

The first Carolina dog that I. Lehr Brisbin took home with him smeared fecal matter all over the back seat of his car. He found her at a pound in Augusta, Georgia in the 1970s, and despite strong discouragement from the pound’s staff (they said she bit everyone who touched her), he managed to wrangle her into a carry crate in his back seat, where “she immediately had a diarrhea attack,” Brisbin recalls. But he was far from discouraged.  Brisbin wanted to take her home because he thought there was something strange and special about her. She resembled some wild dogs he’d seen in the woods along the Savannah River. And Brisbin was starting to put together an exciting hypothesis about why there were wild dogs in the South Carolina lowland that looked and acted different from most others.

At the time, I. Lehr Brisbin was a biologist studying wildlife at the Savannah River Ecology Lab, a field research station of the University of Georgia in Aiken, South Carolina. His research often took him into the 300 square mile wilderness of the Savannah River Ecology site. That’s where he first noticed the wild dogs.  They had long, pointy snouts, ears that permanently stood up and tails that curled back on themselves.  And their behavior, he noticed, was unusual, too. They dug small pits in the ground with their snouts. They hunted in packs and signaled to each other by flashing the white undersides of their tails. They moved as a pack, like wolves.  They were more like Australian Dingoes than European-bred dogs brought to America by colonists.  Brisbin hypothesized that the wild South Carolina dogs descended from canines that belonged to Native Americans, that the dogs’ ancestors had crossed the land bridge between Asia and North America with humans around 12,000 years ago.

Read more
Science & Technology
4:38 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

N.C. Scientist Helps Discover New Carnivore In The Andes

The olinguito is the first new species of carnivore discovered in the western hemisphere in 35 years.
Credit NC Museum of Natural Sciences

A North Carolina scientist is part of a team that's made a big find: the first carnivore to be discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.  

The new animal is called the olinguito (pronounced oh-lin-GHEE-toe). But for the longest time, olinguitos were thought to be olingos, small raccoon-like carnivores that live in the Andes Mountains.

Read more
Environment
2:00 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

N.C. Zoo's Baby Gorillas Celebrate First Birthday

Baby gorillas Bomassa (left) and Apollo (far right) with moms Jamani (second from left) and Olympia will both get a first-birthday party at the N.C. Zoo on August 3.
Credit N.C. Zoo photo by Diane Villa

Baby gorillas Bomassa and Apollo, who were born at the North Carolina Zoo, have reached a milestone: their first birthdays. 

Read more
Arts & Culture
2:14 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

UPDATE: NC Zoo's Third Baby Gorilla Born In 11 Months Dies

This male baby gorilla was delivered by C-Section at N.C. Zoo Sunday Acacia. A name has not yet been chosen.
Credit Aaron Jesue

UPDATE: The North Carolina Zoo announced on Wednesday that the baby gorilla born to mother Acacia has died. They say that the cause is uncertain, although it is possible that the mother may have accidentally rolled over onto the the infant in her sleep.

Read more
The State of Things
10:41 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Red Wolves Return To The Wild

The Secret World of Red Wolves by Delene Beeland.
Credit www.delene.us

When most people think about wolves, they picture the large grey kind made famous in numerous movies. But its smaller cousin, the red wolf, faced extinction at one point. Preservation efforts managed to replenish the animal’s stock, and it now thrives in the wilds of North Carolina. Science writer DeLene Beeland tells their story in her book, “The Secret World of Red Wolves: The Fight to Save North America's Other Wolf” (University of North Carolina Press/2013). Host Frank Stasio talks with Beeland in the studio

The State of Things
11:00 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Deadly Bat Disease Spreads In NC Caves

Little brown bat; close-up of nose with fungus, New York, Oct. 2008.
Credit Photo courtesy Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation

An emerging disease known as White Nose Syndrome has wiped out bats across the Northeast, and now it's spreading in the North Carolina mountains.

Mass bat die-offs could have huge implications for the state's ecology and economy.

Read more
The State of Things
11:38 am
Mon June 17, 2013

What Is The Relationship Between Art And Advertising?

Image of George W. Bush from the series Culture of Corruption.
David Alsobrooks

When Nike used the Beatle’s song “Revolution” in an ad campaign, the Beatles sued. Their lawyer released a statement: “The Beatles’ position is that they don’t sing jingles to peddle sneakers, beer, pantyhose or anything else.” 

Read more

Pages