American Tobacco

Photo of Oscar Charleston's baseball card
Ryan Christoff

Durham and baseball are intimately connected in the minds of many Americans because of the movie "Bull Durham." But the relationship between the city of Durham and the sport dates back to more than a century before the film.

Image of Jim Goodmon, CEO of Capitol Broadcasting Company
Capitol Broadcasting Company

Jim Goodmon was immersed in the world of broadcasting as a young kid, watching his grandfather build Capitol Broadcasting Company from the ground up. He spent his teen years driving around eastern North Carolina giving away free TV antennas to encourage people to start tuning into WRAL.

Charlie Shelton / WUNC

This week, six teenage reporters grabbed a microphone and went out into Durham to find a story. They encountered enthusiastic interviewees and some not-so-enthusiastic near a Durham bus stop on a hot summer’s day.

Bronto, American Tobacco
Leoneda Inge

Durham-based Bronto Software has been sold for $200 million dollars to NetSuite of San Mateo, California.

Bronto Software, founded in 2002, has been growing like gangbusters for years.  

“We had a great 2014, over 40% growth.  And we have even more amazing things for 2015," said CEO Joe Colopy in a video of the company's fourth quarter update in 2014.

Jim Goodmon with his son, Michael.
StoryCorps

American Brands closed the Lucky Strike tobacco factory in downtown Durham in 1987. It was still abandoned in 1995, when Jim Goodmon, President of Capitol Broadcasting Company, built the new Durham Bulls stadium across the street. Goodmon says he’d go to the baseball games and stare at the gigantic, abandoned warehouse. He eventually decided to try to bring it back to life, and he tells that story to his son, Michael.

For decades, ten of thousands of workers walked in to the American Tobacco Company in Durham each day.  This is the story of one of those who stayed the longest.  Annie Lou Andrews is 92 years old. She is the second woman to work in a supervisory role at American Tobacco. She says her first day in leadership, you could feel the tension; the office was quiet enough to hear a pin drop. "I thought, 'uh-oh,'" she says. She spoke with Phoebe Judge.