American South

The State of Things
11:59 am
Thu April 10, 2014

“Liberating Dixie” Traces 50 Years Of Southern Life

Liberating Dixie by Ed Williams

Ed Williams spent almost half a century writing for newspapers in Mississippi and North Carolina. His journalism career started at The Daily Mississippian and continued through 35 years at The Charlotte Observer.

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The State of Things
11:11 am
Wed March 12, 2014

The Dixie Highway And How The South Was Built

Dixie Highway Road Building and the Making of the Modern South, 1900 to 1930
Credit uncpress.unc.edu / UNC Press

Professor and author Tammy Ingram talks about her new book, 'Dixie Highway: Road Building and The Making of the Modern South 1900-1930

    

Before the 20th century, Southern roads were little more than rubble and dirt. Traveling from county to county was difficult and state to state was near impossible. The Dixie Highway, constructed in 1915, shifted control and funding of road regulations from local government to state and federal authorities. 

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The State of Things
12:11 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

One-Man Play Narrates Stories Of Gay Black Men Of The South

Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men Of The South
Credit sweettea-theplay.com / Sweet Tea The Play

A conversation with professor and author E. Patrick Johnson

Television shows like Glee, Will and Grace, and Modern Family portray gay identity as white, northern, and secular. But that was far from E. Patrick Johnson's reality growing up in Hickory, North Carolina. Johnson decided to travel across the South to unearth stories of African American gay men and document his findings in the book Sweet Tea: Gay Black Men of the South (UNC Press/2008).

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The State of Things
5:26 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

'No F****** Pink Ribbons!' Is It Time For The Bow To Go?

Jennifer Ho, English professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Credit englishcomplit.unc.edu / UNC-Chapel Hill

When Jennifer Ho went to the hospital for testing on a lump in her breast, she encountered the image often associated with breast cancer: the pink ribbon.

A nurse led the UNC English professor to an exam room. She recalls, "And then I saw a tote bag with UNC hospital's name on it and the pink ribbon. And I had this immediate visceral reaction. And I'm walking with the nurse. And I said something I can't repeat on the air." Ho said, "I hate those *** pink ribbons."

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Arts & Culture
2:40 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Three Of The Greensboro Four: In Their Own Words

This is the actual Woolworth lunch counter where the protest took place. It is now housed at the Smithsonian.
Credit Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Background to this first person audio story from reporter Jessica Jones:

Back in 2010, I was thrilled to cover the opening of Greensboro's International Civil Rights Center and Museum, housed in the old Woolworth's store where the famous sit-in took place that led to the end of desegregation.

It was exciting for me personally because the assignment allowed me to meet and interview three of the surviving members of the Greensboro Four, the men who as college students showed such incredible courage in integrating the lunch counter.

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The State of Things
12:01 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

Big Decisions Are Best Made With Hot Dogs

Joe Hudson's new book is a collection of essays he wrote for his weekly column in the Statesville Record & Landmark.
Credit Joe Hudson

Big Decisions Are Best Made With Hot Dogs

  

 Joe Hudson's weekly column in the Statesville Record & Landmark entertains readers with its stories about family, friendship, and Southern culture.  

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The State of Things
10:28 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Lifelong Folklorist Unearths Stories From The South

Bill Ferris' new book, The Storied South: Voices of Writers and Artists, presents 40 years of interviews and photographs.
Credit UNC Press

Writer Bill Ferris talks about his latest book The Storied South: Voices of Writers and Artists (UNC Press/ 2013)

For decades, Bill Ferris documented Southern African-American folklore.  His latest book The Storied South: Voices of Writers and Artists presents material from 40 years of interviews with writers, scholars and artists who reflected southern culture in their work.

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The State of Things
11:55 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Childhood Trauma Strongest Precursor To HIV In South

You're The First One I've Told: The Faces of HIV in the Deep South

Kate Whetten, Professor of Public Policy, discusses the rise of HIV cases in the south

For more than a decade, the number of people in our nation who've newly contracted HIV has gone down two percent. But the South doesn't share in that small victory. During the same period of time, the number of people contracting the virus in the South has risen 36 percent.

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The State of Things
11:16 am
Thu June 6, 2013

A Redneck Romance

Tennessee Playboy is a new play written and adapted by Preston Lane, set to debut at Triad Stage.
Credit Triad Stage

A sneak preview of the play 'Tennessee Playboy', premiering at Triad Stage next week

A stranger staggers into an East Tennessee truck stop with a tale of murder. So begins the play Tennessee Playboy, premiering at Triad Stage next week. Host Frank Stasio talks with Triad Stage artistic director Preston Lane about his original adaptation of J.M. Synge's The Playboy of the Western World. Plus, the cast performs a scene.