African-American History

The State of Things
12:02 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Movie Series Looks At History Of America's Music

America's Music is a film and performance series at the North Regional Branch of Wake County Libraries.
Credit http://www.wakegov.com/libraries/events/Pages/americasmusic.aspx

Music and Art Professor Jonathan Kramer discusses his collaborative film project, 'America’s Music'

America’s Music is a film and performance series that traces the soundtrack of a nation. The program features documentary screenings and discussions about the history of 20th century American popular music from blues to Broadway and bluegrass to rock 'n' roll. 

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Arts & Culture
5:46 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Change Of Step At Civil Rights Museum

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum opened in February, 2010. They will soon begin allowing self-guided tours for the first time.
Credit Jeff Tiberii

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro opened in February, 2010. For the first time, leaders of the facility say self-guided tours will be available.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum opened in Greensboro nearly three and a half years ago.  A national sit-in movement began on February 1st, 1960 at an F.W. Woolworth lunch counter on Elm Street, and today that site remains a commemoration and celebration of a chapter in American history.

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The State of Things
10:51 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Abandoning The Black Hero

The film adaptation of Frank Yerby's 1946 best-selling novel, The Foxes of Harrow.
Credit wikipedia.org

A panel of writers and scholars discuss the white life novel.

African-American literary authors like James Baldwin or Zora Neale Hurston are famous for their depictions of black life. But these novelists have also written books with white protagonists. Why is this unexpected? Is there a mandate that black authors write only about black characters?

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The State of Things
12:13 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Buncombe County Puts Slave Records Online

The original deed book of slave records from Buncombe County.
Credit Max Cooper, via mountainx.com

Reporter Jake Frankel speaks with host Isaac-Davy Aronson about Buncombe County's endever to digitize their original slave records

During the Great Depression, the New Deal funded a project to collect the narratives of former slaves.  Sarah Gudger came forward to give an account of her life as a slave in Buncombe County.  Her testimony was the same brutal story that is familiar to many of us.  She described a “hard life” of nothing but “work, work, work,” under the threat of abuse. 

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The State of Things
12:14 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

SBI Investigates Oldest Incorporated African American Town

Freedom Hill in Princeville, NC
Credit wikipedia.org

SBI investigates Princeville, NC

Princeville, North Carolina is the first town created by African Americans in the United States. It was almost wiped out by Hurricane Floyd but survived. Now, it’s facing another threat.

Audits revealed that top-town officials may have been inappropriately using town dollars, and the state has taken over control of Princeville. Host Frank Stasio talks about the situation with Gurnal Scott, assistant news director at WUNC; and Rudolph Knight, a history columnist for The Daily Southerner in Tarboro.

The State of Things
9:52 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Pulitzer Prize-Winner Discusses Definitive Volume On Civil Rights

The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement
Credit taylorbranch.com

A conversation with author Taylor Branch

  Taylor Branch's trilogy on Martin Luther King, Jr. -- "The King Years" -- is widely considered the seminal work on one of the 20th century's most important figures. But at 2,300 combined pages, the three volumes can be a bit daunting for even the most interested reader.

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State of Things
10:04 am
Thu July 12, 2012

The Life of Huey P. Newton

The origins of the Black Panther Party were as a group that wanted to provide self-defense and support to communities overlooked and abused by the authorities. American government and media portrayals dismissed the Panthers as thugs, but filmmaker Dante James wants to tell the true story of the revolutionary members of the radical organization.

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Arts & Culture
7:25 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Pauli Murray Gets State Historic Marker

Pauli Murray marker sits at Carroll and West Chapel Hill Streets in Durham.
Credit Jeanette Stokes

An official state historic marker now sits in the West-End neighborhood of Durham celebrating the life of human rights leader Pauli Murray.

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The State of Things
11:35 am
Tue June 14, 2011

Black Soldiers In The Civil War

Visualize a Civil War soldier and a sepia colored picture of a white man likely comes to mind. But thousands of African Americans in North Carolina served in the Union Army during the Civil War. They trained in the town of New Bern after its fall in March 1962.

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Arts & Culture
5:35 am
Mon April 11, 2011

Eastern NC House To Become Black History Museum

The owners of a historic house in eastern North Carolina are donating it for use as an African-American history museum. The Picot-Armistead-Pettiford House has stood in the small town of Plymouth for nearly 200 years. Local folklore links the house to the Underground Railroad before the Civil War despite Census data that shows the tenants were white and owned slaves. Willie Drye is the leader of a downtown development committee in Plymouth. He says free African-Americans bought the house at auction after the war.

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