African-American History

Image of a plate of soul food, including fried chicken, mac and cheese, collards, and fried okra.
Flickr/Jennifer Woodard Maderazo

Adrian Miller calls himself a “recovering lawyer and politico turned culinary historian.” He went from working as a special assistant to former President Bill Clinton and a legislative director for former Colorado Governor Bill Ritter to becoming a soul food scholar.

“Practicing law was not the thing for me,” Miller says.“I was singing spirituals in my office, so I figured I needed to do something else.”

    

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of key moments in the civil rights movement, including Bloody Sunday and the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Marco Williams

Marco Williams is a filmmaker who is not afraid of telling stories that others don't want to tell. 

Image of actor Alphonse NIcholson playing the character Abel Green in Frieght.
Nick Graetz

  

A new one-man show by playwright Howard Craft tells the story of a man who exists in five incarnations at different points in American history. 

Raleigh Little Theatre

In popular culture, the term cakewalk means anything that is effortless and easy.

African-American children's book "Tobe"
UNC Press

    

First published in 1939 by UNC Press, the picture book Tobe was a rare children's story featuring an African-American protagonist.

The book follows a boy who works hard on his family farm. The story uses the real photos of people who lived in an African-American township just outside of Greensboro called Goshen.

The book gave a historical glimpse into African-American communities in North Carolina, but left open questions about what happened to these families in the decades to come.

The book, "Jim Crow Wisdom," (UNC Press/2013) explores stories black Americans tell about their past and the way those stories inform modern black identity. 

Dixie Highway Road Building and the Making of the Modern South, 1900 to 1930
uncpress.unc.edu / UNC Press

    

Before the 20th century, Southern roads were little more than rubble and dirt. Traveling from county to county was difficult and state to state was near impossible. The Dixie Highway, constructed in 1915, shifted control and funding of road regulations from local government to state and federal authorities. 

Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men Of The South
sweettea-theplay.com / Sweet Tea The Play

Television shows like Glee, Will and Grace, and Modern Family portray gay identity as white, northern, and secular. But that was far from E. Patrick Johnson's reality growing up in Hickory, North Carolina. Johnson decided to travel across the South to unearth stories of African American gay men and document his findings in the book Sweet Tea: Gay Black Men of the South (UNC Press/2008).

State of the Re:Union - Re:Defining Black History 2014
State of the Re:Union

The public radio program State of the Re:Union has a lofty goal. They want to tell the story of America, one community at a time.

On Monday January 20 at noon and 8 p.m. WUNC will present a State of the Re:Union special called Re:Defining Black History 2014. (Listen to the show here.)

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