Advertising

Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

The title of last night’s show,"Favors," accurately sums up a major theme seen in the episode.  Many characters need or give favors, though not without consequences.  The SC&P staff realizes that they are competing for two similar clients, Sunkist and Ocean Spray, so one will have to be resigned. While talking to Peggy, Pete’s mother claims she is in love with her nurse Manolo, and implies that their relationship is sexual. Sylvia and Arnold are afraid because their son Mitchell is reclassified 1A by the draft after dropping out of school and sending back his draft card in protest.

Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

The riots and politics of the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago continually weave in and out of Episode 10, through media and discussions. The partners begin discussing changing the agency's name.  Don, Roger and Harry travel to Los Angeles for client presentations, including Carnation. Harry drives Don and Roger to a party in the Hollywood Hills.  Starlets and stoned hippies roam poolside. Don is invited to share a hit from a hookah. His hallucination ends with him seeing himself face down in the swimming pool. He comes to on the deck, wet and coughing, with a soaked and out-of-breath Roger telling everyone he's fine.

Repository: Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

This is a weekly column written by the Hartman Center, part of Duke University's Rubenstein Library that studies advertising history. Each Monday they dig through their archive to find ads for items referenced in the latest Mad Men episode. Here is this week's column (originally posted on their blog) written by Jacqueline Wachholz and the Hartman Center.

Mad Men Mondays: The Hartman Center Tackles Episode 6

May 6, 2013
Mad Men Mondays
John W. Hartman Center, Duke University Rubenstein Library

Starting today, WUNC will begin publishing the latest "Mad Men Monday" column written by the Hartman Center. A part of Duke University's Rubenstein Library, the Hartman Center studies advertising history, and each Monday they dig through their archive to find ads for items referenced in the latest Mad Men episode. Here is this week's column, written by Jacqueline Wachholz and the Hartman Center (originally posted here):

courtesy of Hartman Center, Rubenstein Library, Duke University.

AMC’s new Mad Men season debuted in April and has a lot of people talking. Locally, it’s creating a buzz at the Hartman Center, part of Duke's Rubenstein Library which specializes in advertising and marketing history. The center is an international resource for all things ad-related, and their archives are full of the sort of ads seen on Mad Men.

Beercade: The Last Barfighter
McKinney

Arcade games have long been a popular bar distraction, but Durham-based ad agency McKinney has recently taken coin-operated entertainment to a new level. Instead of inserting quarters and playing for points, two players can now insert their beer cups and battle each other for a drink. They call it the Beercade.

Chapel Hill town officials have suspended the policy that determines which advertisements are placed on transit buses.

Chapel Hill could decide soon whether to allow a pro-Israel group's ads to appear on town buses.

The American Freedom Defense Initiative's message says in part, "In Any War Between the Civilized Man and the Savage, Support the Civilized Man.” Assistant Transit Director Brian Litchfield says the town is reviewing it.

Brian Litchfield: "Our hope is to communicate with AFDI sometime this week regarding any thoughts that staff might have."

A recent study at North Carolina State University highlights how deceptive advertising affects the brains of consumers. This could have implications for aging and injured brains and how they are able to vet advertising for falsehoods. Host Frank Stasio talks about the study with Stacy Wood, Langdon Distinguished Professor of Marketing at N.C. State University’s Poole College of Management.

This program originally aired on June 20, 2012. For a link to the audio, click here.

A recent study at North Carolina State University highlights how deceptive advertising affects the brains of consumers. This could have implications for aging and injured brains and how they are able to vet advertising for falsehoods. Host Frank Stasio talks about the study with Stacy Wood, Langdon Distinguished Professor of Marketing at N.C. State University’s Poole College of Management.

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