2016 Presidential Election

Image of newspaper front pages reporting on Trump's win
(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

A long and heated campaign cycle is over, and Donald Trump is poised to become the 45th president of the United States. Many analysts are calling Trump’s win the biggest upset in modern political history. As politicians and analysts examine the results, world leaders are also joining in the conversation.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

The 2016 election cycle has been strange, unorthodox, offensive, entertaining, unpredictable, divisive and long.

For more than a year, strategists have tried to use scandals, wedge issues and the media, among other political tools, as candidates chase victory on Election Night. But now, it all comes down to numbers. Here are a few to consider in the final stretch of the campaign.

The countdown to Election Day is on, and candidates are hitting the trail in North Carolina. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump visited the state earlier this week and democratic nominee Hillary Clinton stops in Winston-Salem later today, in a joint appearance with first lady Michelle Obama. What do the presidential campaigns do for candidates down ballot? And how close is the gubernatorial race? Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC capitol bureau chief Jeff Tiberii about the latest. 

North Carolina Voter Guide For The 2016 Election

Oct 20, 2016
Voters fill out their ballots at the Hamilton County Board of Elections as early voting begins statewide, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / ASSOCIATED PRESS

The presidential race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will top the ballot for voters this November. But other races will also be important to North Carolina voters, including the race for Governor, U.S. Senate, Attorney General and state Supreme Court. Here's a guide to sift through the important questions as voting gets underway.

Fact Check Of The Final Presidential Debate

Oct 19, 2016
A television camera operator tests his position during a rehearsal for the third presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at UNLV in Las Vegas, Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016.
Patrick Semansky / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump face off tonight for a third and final presidential debate. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, are annotating the debate live.

Donald Trump
Greg Richter / Flickr Creative Commons

Donald Trump held another rally in Greensboro Friday afternoon. The embattled Republican candidate for president wasted no time blasting his opponent, Hillary Clinton, ahead of the last presidential debate next week.

Fact Check Of The Second Presidential Debate

Oct 9, 2016
A videographer adjust his camera before the start the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016.
Julio Cortez / Associated Press

Presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump face off tonight for the second of three presidential debates. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, are annotating the debate live. 

Alex Sanz / ASSOCIATED PRESS

First Lady Michelle Obama campaigned for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Charlotte and Raleigh on Tuesday.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes the stage at a campaign stop at Wake Technical Community College in Raleigh, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016.
Matt Rourke / ASSOCIATED PRESS

During Hillary Clinton's campaign stop in Raleigh Tuesday, she focused heavily on her plans to make the American economy fairer for all families.

Composite photo of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.
U.S. Embassy and Gage Skidmore / flickr

North Carolina's status as a crucial state in the upcoming presidential election was on display Tuesday.

Tim Kaine spoke in Wilmington, a couple hours before former President Bill Clinton visited Durham.

Photo of Don Gonyea
Doby Photography / NPR

Election Day is just more than two months away.

And the two contenders for the White House are on the trail, making their pleas to voters and attacking each other. No two candidates in history have had less favorable ratings than Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

NPR political correspondent Don Gonyea is taking a look at how voters, especially women in North Carolina, are approaching this race. Host Frank Stasio talks with Gonyea about his reporting, the candidates and life on the trail. ​

Ken Rudin
kenrudinpolitics.com

All signs point to the fact that North Carolina has become a battleground in the race for the White House.

New polls out this week indicate a tight race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and both campaigns are spending large sums of money on campaign advertisements.

The Senate race between Richard Burr and Deborah Ross is also in a dead heat. Will North Carolina's voters help the Democrats take back the Senate?

Host Frank Stasio talks with Ken Rudin, the political junkie, about the 2016 election.

In Fayetteville, N.C., Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump spoke mainly about the economy. But much of the media attention focused on a remark he made earlier in the day that critics say advocated violence against his opponents.

Republican Vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during a town hall meeting in Raleigh, N.C., Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016.
Gerry Broome / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Speaking to a crowd of about 300 people at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Raleigh, Indiana Governor Mike Pence said if Republicans take back the White House in November, they will cut taxes, repeal Obamacare and put Americans back to work.

Tim Kaine in Greensboro, N.C.
Chuck Burton / ASSOCIATED PRESS

At a rally in Greensboro Wednesday afternoon, Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Tim Kaine said voters cannot trust Donald Trump, criticized House Bill 2 and stressed the importance of this swing state in November.

Photo of Mike Pence and Pat McCrory
Evan Vucci / AP

With a little more than three months until the 2016 elections, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is facing strong backlash—even from some fellow Republicans—​against his latest verbal onslaught, in which he attacked the parents of a fallen soldier.

The controversy comes as Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton opens a sizable post-convention lead in most polls. Will this latest controversy affect Trump's chances in North Carolina? And what effect could it have on Gov. Pat McCrory, who has campaigned with Trump in the state?

Donald Trump addressed the annual VFW Convention on Tuesday, July 26, 2016.
Jay Price / WUNC

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke at the annual Veterans of Foreign Wars Convention in Charlotte Tuesday, a day after his rival Hillary Clinton tried to woo voters in the same crowd.

Governor Pat McCrory
Hal Goodtree / Flickr Creative Commons

The NBA announced that the 2017 All-Star Game will not be held in Charlotte as planned.

The decision comes after state lawmakers did not make enough changes to the law known as House Bill 2 to satisfy the league. It could cost the state more than $100 million in economic impact and the decision will be a factor in the gubernatorial race between incumbent Gov. Pat McCrory and Democratic challenger Roy Cooper.

Composite photo of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.
U.S. Embassy and Gage Skidmore / flickr

With the Republican National Convention in Cleveland now over, the national political spotlight turns to the Democrats, who will nominate their candidate in Philadelphia next week. After that, it's onto the final three-month stretch of this ultra-marathon race. North Carolina is again a swing state and expected to be a regular part of the political terrain through November.

The Republican Party has gathered in Cleveland to officially declare Donald J. Trump as the 2016 presidential nominee.

While Trump supporters hope to "Make America Great Again," many GOP establishment politicians opted not to attend the festivities. And Ted Cruz’s refusal to endorse Trump draws criticism from the crowd.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

Donald Trump announces Mike Pence will be his running mate in his bid for the White House.

Trump delayed the decision last night in the wake of the attack in Nice, France. He revealed his choice of the Indiana governor on Twitter earlier today. His decision comes as the Republican party gears up for its convention in Cleveland.

And on the Democratic side of the ticket, Bernie Sanders steps aside and endorses Hillary Clinton as the presidential nominee. Meanwhile, legal challenges to North Carolina's voter ID requirements continue in the courts.

Composite photo of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.
U.S. Embassy and Gage Skidmore / flickr

Updated July 6 at 7:06 a.m.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump fired up supporters at two separate rallies in North Carolina Tuesday, as both presumptive presidential candidates sought to gain a lead in the battleground state.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

The United States Supreme Court issued decisions this week in several high profile cases related to abortion restrictions and immigration regulations.

The high court also agreed to hear North Carolina's redistricting suit. Their decisions could affect voters in November.

PHOTOS: Hillary Clinton Campaigns In Raleigh

Jun 22, 2016
Hillary Clinton speaks in Raleigh
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton made her first campaign stop in North Carolina since the end of the primary season.

She told several thousand supporters at the Exposition Center at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh that if elected, she would launch a job creation plan during her first hundred days in office.

photo of Congress
Lawrence Jackson, whitehouse.gov.

North Carolina held its second primary of the year Tuesday and voters cast their ballots for representatives in Congress and a seat on the state's highest judiciary.

Pages