2014 NC Legislature

Here's what NC's early vote looks like http://wapo.st/1x8ulLQ
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This is our election night blog. Complete election results can be found here.

NPR Politics Desk
NPR

This is NPR's blog following the hotly contested 2014 election:

Here are the latest 2014 mid-term election results from the North Carolina Board of Elections. (See a wider version of this information).

The run up to midterm elections has sparked many heated legal and ideological arguments over voting procedures and requirements. To understand the debate, I went to Charlotte, North Carolina for a live community conversation around these voting laws. The U.S. Supreme Court has allowed a North Carolina law to go into effect that eliminates same-day voter registration and reduces the number of early voting days.

This is the voter guide.
NC Center for Voter Education/UNC-TV

U.S. House, State Senate, District Attorney, Board of Commissioners, Register of Deeds, Sheriff, N.C. Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, N.C. District Court...there will be a lot more names on your ballot than those running for U.S. Senate.

In my county, there are 22 choices to be made.

Ahead of the midterm elections, Michel Martin is visiting Charlotte, N.C., to learn more about Latino voters' growing influence in the state. Join Michel for a Facebook chat from 4:30-5 p.m. ET today as she answers questions and shares more on her reporting.

There is a comprehensive, interactive Google map that shows early voting locations across the state.

Click here to see precise locations and hours, even directions. Most locations are open Monday-Friday until close of business. Saturday hours are also available.

You can vote in any of the early voting locations in your county.

Early voting continues until 11/1.

Photo: 'Vote Here' sign in English and Spanish
Flickr user Erik Hersman

Friday was the deadline to register to vote in North Carolina. The U.S. Supreme Court has allowed the state's new voting law to be in place, eliminating same-day registration in the days before the election. In response, some groups increased their voter registration efforts. The Durham Board of Elections has been getting so many registrations that they doubled their staff from six to 12.

Judy Harwood usually works at the front desk, but the other day she was typing up names and addresses in an overflow room in the back of the building.

A Duke Energy power plant and coal ash ponds outside Asheville.
Zen Sutherland

A few members of the North Carolina House of Representatives will be back in Raleigh for a skeleton session today, but no real business is expected to be conducted. Technically, they need to be there to keep the legislature in session. That’s because they couldn’t agree with their colleagues in the Senate on one of their main priorities this summer – what to do about 33 coal ash dumps around the state.

This story starts in February this year, and you might have seen it on national newscasts.

Wright School
Dave DeWitt

Doris Tilley has driven by the Wright School, on Roxboro Street in Durham, for 50 some-odd years. Many times, she’s thought of turning into the gravel driveway, to re-visit the place that had such a significant impact on her family.

Last Friday, she did just that, meeting with students and staff.

Tilley’s daughter was one of the very first students here, in 1963. It was one of the few positive educational experiences she would ever have.

photo of the NC legislature
Wikimedia

    

Republican senators walked out of budget negotiations this morning at the General Assembly this morning. The move followed House Republican Senior Chairman Nelson Dollar's call for educators to speak to the joint body.

"One of the reasons why we felt it was important to bring folks forward is that if these are going to be public meetings, let's have some public input," Dollar said. 

But Senate Majority Leader Harry Brown said Representative Dollar overstepped when he called for outside testimony.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

  Budget writers in the General Assembly are moving forward with their negotiations, but it's still not clear when they might finish putting together a spending plan adjustment for the fiscal year that has already begun.

In an open conference committee Tuesday afternoon, legislators didn't reach an agreement on the size of teacher raises, though Senate budget writers have agreed to allow teachers to receive raises without forgoing career status protections. 

Promotional trailers: Homeland, Ironman 3, Hunger Games
Showtime, Marvel Studios, Lionsgate

North Carolina could see fewer hits like Iron Man 3 or Homeland filmed in the state. That’s because tax incentives that encourage the film industry to make movies here are set to expire in January. Some lawmakers are trying to pass a measure that would give grants to the film industry to keep production companies here. But while budget negotiations are underway, time is running out to pass legislation.

Gov. Pat McCrory stands at a podium and speaks to the Emerging Issues Forum on Monday.
Dave DeWitt

Gov. Pat McCrory says he and budget negotiators in the state House and Senate have serious differences over Medicaid budget forecasts and education spending. He spoke with reporters on Monday, saying he was taking precautions in case lawmakers aren't able to put together a budget before July 1st. 

Gov. Pat McCrory
NC Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory is relatively new to Raleigh but is an old hand at politics.

He was first elected to the Charlotte City Council in 1989. He went on to serve for fourteen years as the mayor of North Carolina’s largest city.  McCrory first ran for governor against Beverly Perdue, but lost in 2008. 

Four years later, he ran again, and won. It was the first time since Reconstruction that North Carolina had both a Republican governor and GOP majorities in both houses. 

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