2014 NC Election

Photo of Republican John Alexander and Democrat Tom Bradshaw
Alexander for NC Senate, Tom Bradshaw for NC Senate

Former Raleigh Mayor Tom Bradshaw requested a recount on Monday afternoon in his race for the North Carolina Senate against Republican John Alexander, with 701 votes separating them in the closest General Assembly contest this year.

Alexander led Bradshaw by .86 percent in a race with a turn-out of about 82,000 voters, according to certified Wake County Board of Elections results.
 

Governor Pat McCrory says he's pleased with last night's Republican victories in both statewide and Congressional elections, although he told WUNC earlier today that some of those victories were unexpected, especially on the state level.

"I was very surprised, frankly, based upon our surveys and others, that we didn't lose any seats in the Senate- in fact, we gained one,  and we lost very few seats in the House," said McCrory.

Voter Sticker
Vox Efx on Flickr

    

Republican State House Speaker Thom Tillis defeated incumbent Senator Kay Hagan in one of the most-watched and most expensive races in the country. Hagan's defeat was one of several nationwide that gave Senate control to the GOP.

At the state level, the Republican party maintained control of both houses of the legislature.

The four Democratic winners pose with Congressman David Price
Reema Khrais

After sweeping all four open seats, Democrats now have full control of the Wake County Board of Commissioners.

“It looks like we did it. The people of Wake County have chosen to move forward,” said John Burns, a business lawyer from Raleigh. He unseated Coble.

Democrats Matt Calabria, Sig Hutchinson, John Burns and Jessica Holmes each captured about 55 percent of the vote, defeating Commissioners Joe Bryant, Paul Coble, Phil Matthews and Rich Gianni.

Photo: The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Jorge Valencia

North Carolina Republicans maintained their super majority in the state House and Senate after Tuesday night’s election, meaning they will continue to have the ability to override gubernatorial vetoes and pass laws without a single vote from Democrats.

In the Senate, Republicans gained one seat, raising their majority to 34 seats in the 50-member changer. In the House, Democrats gained as many as four seats, likely lowering the Republican majority to 73 seats in the 120-member house.

New Right: Judge Or Jury

Nov 5, 2014
Picture of gavel
Flickr.com

State voters passed a constitutional amendment that would give people accused of a felony a choice to have a judge hear their trial rather than a jury of their peers. The amendment was approved with about 54% of the vote. 

Up until last night's vote, North Carolina stood alone in refusing to allow that choice.  The option will only be available to persons not facing the death penalty. 

This story was updated at 1:02 a.m. ET

Republicans have picked up the seats they needed to retake control of the Senate and then some, with major victories in North Carolina, Iowa, Colorado and Arkansas, and added to their margin in the U.S. House.

The big numbers from the midterm election reshape the political dynamic in Washington and will complicate the legislative agenda for President Obama's final two years in the White House.

Here's what NC's early vote looks like http://wapo.st/1x8ulLQ
@PostReid via Twitter

This is our election night blog. Complete election results can be found here.

You thought that "I'm a Voter" app at the top of your Facebook newsfeed was just some cute flair, right?

Well, it actually makes a difference. No, really. Some serious scientists collaborated with Facebook in 2010 and found that the app added 340,000 additional voters that election cycle.

Here's how The New Republic explained the methodology:

Still wondering where to put your money on the Senate races tonight?

There's been a lot of contradictory data flying around in the final hours and days of Campaign 2014, so don't feel alone. You can find polls in swing states that say the races are too close to call, and you can find others that show the Republican candidate opening a lead. You can, of course, listen to the party advocates and pundits, but while highly expert they are always pushing a given point of view.

NPR Politics Desk
NPR

This is NPR's blog following the hotly contested 2014 election:

Here are the latest 2014 mid-term election results from the North Carolina Board of Elections. (See a wider version of this information).

The run up to midterm elections has sparked many heated legal and ideological arguments over voting procedures and requirements. To understand the debate, I went to Charlotte, North Carolina for a live community conversation around these voting laws. The U.S. Supreme Court has allowed a North Carolina law to go into effect that eliminates same-day voter registration and reduces the number of early voting days.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

A conservative activist known for making undercover videos of what he says is illegal or unethical political conduct says he’s found campaign volunteers at six local North Carolina campaigns giving inaccurate information about voting eligibility.
 

teacher in a blur with classroom
Bart Everson / Flickr/Creative Commons

With Election Day almost here, it’s become clear that one issue has headlined almost all of the races: education.

Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Kay Hagan and her Republican challenger Thom Tillis have traded barbs over issues of teacher pay and education funding, while similar conversations are playing out in legislative races throughout the state.

A picture of an 'I Voted' sticker.
Vox Efx / Flickr

Four out of of seven seats on Wake County's Board of Commissioners are up for election. Republicans currently occupy those positions, but if just one of them loses, Democrats will have a majority on the board.

The Democratic and Republican candidates for the four seats up for election differentiate themselves mostly by ideology. The Republican incumbents are loath to raise taxes and are not openly supportive of a transit tax proposal. Their relationship with the county school board has been tense.

Mark Walker and Laura FJeld both hope to replace 83-year-old Howard Coble who is retiring after 30 years in Congress.
US House of Representatives

There will be a new representative of North Carolina’s 6th congressional district this winter. Republican Howard Coble is retiring after 30 years in the U.S. House. Vying to replace the 83-year-old mainstay are political newcomers Mark Walker and Laura Fjeld. Those candidates met for a second debate Wednesday night in High Point.

Mark Walker was a high school quarterback without a driver’s license. Laura Fjeld was a young attorney in Durham, raising a son. And Howard Coble had just been voted into Congress, his first of 15 consecutive terms. That was 1984.

Photo of Republican John Alexander and Democrat Tom Bradshaw
Alexander for NC Senate, Tom Bradshaw for NC Senate

The friendship between Tom Bradshaw and John Alexander has lasted more than 40 years, and has revolved around YMCA gymnasiums.

Bradshaw has been dedicated to the Y since he went to youth camps growing up. And Alexander, whose father got involved decades ago, has spent much of his life at the YMCA.  

They’re both on the executive board of the YMCA of the Triangle and on other community boards.

This year they both want to be the state senator for the northern part of Wake County.

Planned Parenthood's Cecile Richards, left, stumps for Democratic U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan, right.
Jessica Jone / WUNC

With only eight days left to go before Election Day, the race for North Carolina’s U.S. Senate seat is in high gear. Democratic incumbent Senator Kay Hagan is in a tight race with Republican state Speaker of the House Thom Tillis. Both campaigns are pulling out all the stops to get people to the polls- including bringing national political stars to town.

This is the voter guide.
NC Center for Voter Education/UNC-TV

U.S. House, State Senate, District Attorney, Board of Commissioners, Register of Deeds, Sheriff, N.C. Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, N.C. District Court...there will be a lot more names on your ballot than those running for U.S. Senate.

In my county, there are 22 choices to be made.

Election Day is Tuesday Nov. 4, 2014
Ludovic Bertron / Flickr/Creative Commons

Here are the top three questions the volunteers at ncvoterguide.org are currently being asked:

1. Is it too late to register to vote?

Yes, it is too late to register. If you didn't register, you can't vote.

2. Do I need any identification to vote?

You do not need any identification to vote. That is due to change in 2016, but for now, just show up.

3. Where do I vote?

Ahead of the midterm elections, Michel Martin is visiting Charlotte, N.C., to learn more about Latino voters' growing influence in the state. Join Michel for a Facebook chat from 4:30-5 p.m. ET today as she answers questions and shares more on her reporting.

Thom Tillis and Kay Hagan
NC General Assembly/US Senate

    

As the midterm elections get closer, education is a prominent topic in North Carolina’s congressional races. 

There is a comprehensive, interactive Google map that shows early voting locations across the state.

Click here to see precise locations and hours, even directions. Most locations are open Monday-Friday until close of business. Saturday hours are also available.

You can vote in any of the early voting locations in your county.

Early voting continues until 11/1.

Pages