North Carolina Voices

The State of Things
12:42 pm
Thu June 16, 2011

The Homefront is the Battlefront

Movie still from the film, ''Gone with the Wind''

Thavolia Glymph and Laura Edwards join host Frank Stasio

The Civil War is often referred to as the last war fought on American soil. Since then, we fight wars over seas and we watch the battles play out on TV or the Internet. For black and white women living in the American South, the Civil War was fought all around them, but the true enemies were poverty, hunger and despair. For those women, the battlefront was not a distant idea because the battlefront was the homefront. As part of our series, “North Carolina Voices: The Civil War,” Thavolia Glymph and Laura Edwards join host Frank Stasio to discuss what life was like for women in North Carolina during the war.

Read more
The State of Things
12:38 pm
Thu June 16, 2011

North Carolina Quakers During The Civil War

Did you know that Quakers were the first organized non-native religious group in the Carolinas? In the late 1600s, the governor and assembly of North Carolina were majority Quaker. Today, the Piedmont Triad has the largest concentration of Quakers in North America. But leading up to the Civil War, Quakers left the state in droves because of their opposition to slavery. During the war, their pacifism sent them north and west to free states. Greensboro’s Guilford College was first established as a boarding school in 1837 in order to maintain some Quaker presence in the state.

Read more
The State of Things
11:44 am
Wed June 15, 2011

State's Rights and the Reconstruction Amendments

Michael Gerhardt
Credit law.unc.edu

The 14th Amendment may be the most hotly debated 2,000 words in American history. It was adopted on July 9, 1868 and is considered the most important of the “Reconstruction Amendments.” Those amendments - the 13th, 14th and 15th - reconfigure the relationship between the states and the federal government. Among other things, they put the federal government in the position of monitoring the way states protect civil rights.

Read more
Arts & Culture
6:00 am
Wed June 15, 2011

Civil War Monuments Loom Large

The Reidsville monument... without the statue.
Credit Rose Hoban

All over North Carolina, statues of Confederate soldiers stand sentry in front of courthouses, churches and in public squares.
 

It was a dark and stormy night in Reidsville early on May 23rd...

Read more
The State of Things
11:35 am
Tue June 14, 2011

Black Soldiers In The Civil War

Visualize a Civil War soldier and a sepia colored picture of a white man likely comes to mind. But thousands of African Americans in North Carolina served in the Union Army during the Civil War. They trained in the town of New Bern after its fall in March 1962.

Read more
The State of Things
10:40 am
Mon June 13, 2011

Meet Heather Williams

Credit history.unc.edu

Heather Williams experienced racism for the first time when she moved to Brooklyn from Jamaica at 11 years old. That’s when she discovered that black was considered bad in the United States, though she didn't know why. Her high school library’s Black Studies section began her education in racial history. Her fascination with the subject would lead her to one day become a civil rights lawyer, and later, a teacher of history.

Read more
Education
6:00 am
Mon June 13, 2011

Teaching The Civil War

Brick At Stagville
Credit Dave DeWitt

The first public school in North Carolina was created in 1840. Before the Civil War, those schools were reserved only for Whites. And then, four years after the war ended, the system was revived.

Segregated schools were the law in the state for much of the 20th century. And as you might imagine, the Civil War was taught much differently depending on the color of the students’ skin.

Read more
Health
6:00 am
Fri April 22, 2011

How to Create Better Housing for People with Mental Health Disabilities

Nashville housing counselor Louetta Hix
Credit Rose Hoban

  In the last 10 years, multiple studies have concluded that housing people with mental health disabilities in adult and family care homes is not the best plan for them. Each study has recommended phasing out use of the homes and improving the system. Despite that, the number of homes has increased along with the number of adults with mental illness who live in them.

Read more
Health
7:00 am
Fri July 2, 2010

Waste 2 Watts To Power Medical Devices

The Cell Saver

Rose Hoban reports on some young people who hope to contribute to the future of global health.

In the past, global health work tended to be limited to doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. But engineering plays a role in health care around the world. From infrastructure projects, to supporting medical equipment, engineers are becoming an essential part of the global health landscape.

Read more
Health
7:00 am
Thu July 1, 2010

Durham Workers Test Condoms for Worldwide Distribution

FHI worker Joseph Galloway detects holes in condoms by filling them with water.
Credit Rose Hoban

Rose Hoban takes a visit to FHI’s product testing lab.

When people think of global health, they might picture heroic doctors or selfless nurses. But many others work behind the scenes in global health, doing work that’s much less sexy, but equally essential.  Some of those people work here in the Triangle in a lab that tests life-preserving and life-saving products shipped around the world. Central to their work is testing condoms for safety and effectiveness.  In the next installment of our series, North Carolina Voices, Global Health Comes Home, Rose Hoban takes a visit to FHI’s product testing lab.

Read more

Pages